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March 2014

Monday, March 3, 2014
4:30 PM - 7:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E St NW

CANCELED
Girls' Education and School-related Gender-based Violence


Panelists:

Julie Hanson Swanson, Acting Chief, Education Division, Bureau for Africa, USAID

Eugene Katzin, Senior Technical Officer, Gender Department, FHI 360

Additional panelists to be announced.

Discussant:

Maryce Ramsey, Senior Gender Specialist, Gender Department, FHI 360

Between 500 million and 1.5 billion children experience violence every year, many within and around the school community. School-related gender based violence (SRGBV) is a global phenomenon that is a barrier to girls' and boys' educational achievements, is correlated with lower academic achievement and economic security, and leads to greater long-term health risks. SRGBV is related to other cycles of violence in the community, particularly for girls, and reinforces harmful gender norms. What is the development community doing to address SRGBV and its impact on girls' education worldwide? This interactive panel discussion will examine the connections between SRGBV and girls' access to, retention in, and completion of school. Panelists will explore challenges to preventing SRGBV, approaches for changing norms, and opportunities for empowering girls, and will offer solutions for fostering safe learning environments to improve educational outcomes for girls and boys alike.

Panel: 5:00-7:00 pm

Light reception to begin at 4:30 and continue after panel.

RSVP: http://bit.ly/1m3xIlB

Sponsored by FHI 360 and the Global Gender Program

Monday, March 3, 2014
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Funger Hall, Room 108
2201 G Street NW

CANCELED
Tunisia's New Constitution with YPFP and Tunisian American Young Professionals


Bowman Cutter, Chairman, Tunisian-American Enterprise Fund

Mustapha Kamel Nabli, former governor of the Central Bank of Tunisia

In light of Tunisia's new constitution, the Young Professionals in Foreign Policy and Tunisian American Young Professionals will discuss the successes the country has experienced and the path that lies ahead. Many regard Tunisia's post-revolution story as a model for the other Arab Spring countries. What has set Tunisia apart from its counterparts in the region and what challenges will it now face in the implementation of its constitution?

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/tunisia

Sponsored by the Young Professionals in Foreign Policy, the Tunisian American Young Professionals, and the Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication

Tuesday, March 4, 2014
12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E St NW

POSTPONED
Rouhani's Iran


Panelists:

Arang Keshavarzian, Associate Profressor, New York University

Mohammad Ayatollahi Tabaar, Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University

Kaveh Ehsani, Assistant Professor, DePaul University

Moderator:

Marc Lynch, Professor, George Washington University

Join POMEPS for a reflection on developments during Rouhani's first seven months in office and what they mean moving forward for Iran and the international community.

A light lunch will be provided.

RSVP: http://bit.ly/MaqDip

Sponsored by the Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS)

Tuesday, March 4, 2014
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Monroe Hall, Kendrick Conference Room, 3rd Floor
2115 G St NW

Trade and The Topography of the Spacial Economy


Costas Arkolakis, Associate Professor, Yale Economics

We develop a versatile general equilibrium framework to determine the spatial distribution of economic activity on any surface with (nearly) any geography. Combining the gravity structure of trade with labor mobility, we provide conditions for the existence, uniqueness, and stability of a spatial economic equilibrium and derive a simple set of differential equations which govern the relationship between economic activity and the geography of the surface. We then use the framework to estimate the topography of trade costs, productivities, amenities and the strength of spillovers in the United States. We find that geographic location accounts for 24% of the observed spatial distribution of income. Finally, we calculate that the construction of the interstate highway system increased welfare by 3.47%, roughly twice its cost.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/iieppolicyforums1213

Sponsored by the Institute for International Economic Policy and the GW Department of Economics

Tuesday, March 4, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E St NW

Is There a Local Knowledge Advantage in Federations? The 2010 Russian Forest Fires as a Natural Experiment


Alexander Libman, Assistant Professor, Frankfurt School of Finance & Management

The local knowledge advantage is arguably one of the key arguments in favor of political decentralization: sub-national governments have better information on the specifics of their regions and thus are able to implement better policies. There are, however, few attempts to explicitly test this argument empirically. In this presentation, prepared with Andre Schultz, Alexander Libman attempts to provide empirical evidence for the local knowledge effects, investigating the behavior of Russian subnational governments. He argues that politicians, who have spent longer periods of their life in a particular region, possess better knowledge of that region than outsiders. The presentation investigates how local origin affected the performance of politicians in a natural experiment, studying the responses of regional governors in Russia to the disastrous forest fires in 2010. Forest management is one of few government functions which were decentralized in Russia in the last decade. The evidence demonstrates that the characteristics of the governors had a major impact on the Russian regions' ability to combat forest fires.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Libman

Sponsored by the IERES

Tuesday, March 4, 2014
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

City View Room, 7th Floor
1957 E Street NW

Annual David H. Miller Event: Security and Conflict in the Horn of Africa


The 2014 Annual David Miller event will address security and conflict in the Horn of Africa. The region faces a number of security issues, from spreading conflict in South Sudan to the resurgence of militant group al-Shabaab. Amb. David Shinn will chair a panel of experts as they discuss the prospects for peace and security given these conflicts and other regional developments.

E.J. Hogendoorn, Deputy Director, Africa, International Crisis Group

Nairimas Ole-Sein, Head of Chancery, Embassy of Kenya

J. Peter Pham, Director, Africa Center, Atlantic Council

Discussion chair:
Ambassador David Shinn, Adjunct Professor of International Affairs, GW; Former United States Ambassador to Ethiopia (1996-99) and to Burkina Faso (1987-90)

6:00 - 7:00 PM Lecture; 7:00 - 7:30 PM Reception

RSVP: go.gwu.edu/hornofafrica

Sponsored by the David H. Miller Foundation and the Elliott School of International Affairs

Tuesday, March 4, 2014
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Elliott School, Room 213
1957 E Street NW

JERUSALEM: A Discussion on the Making of the Film


Introduction:
Lisa Truitt, President, National Geographic Cinema Ventures

Protagonists of the Film:
Farah Ammouri, Student, Collin County College
Nadia Tadros, Student, Birzeit University and the Magnificat Institute
Revital Zacharie, Recent Graduate, Pelech High School

In this program, join the young women from the film JERUSALEM for a discussion about the making of the film and its themes. Using the world's most advanced 3D and IMAX film technology, JERUSALEM brings to audiences spectacular, never-before-seen footage of this much-loved 5,000-year-old city. The film tells the complicated and fascinating story of Jerusalem through the viewpoints of the three main religions-Christianity, Islam and Judaism. Each is represented by a young woman who shows us "her" Jerusalem. The archaeology of Jerusalem is also explored in the film to understand its importance in world history.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/jerusalem

Sponsored by the Rabin Chair Forum, the Middle East Policy Forum, the Middle East Program of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the Judaic Studies Program, and GW Libraries

Wednesday, March 5, 2014
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

The OAS and the Promotion & Protection of Human Rights in the Americas


Emilio Alvarez, Executive Secretary of the Inter American Commission of Human Rights

This event is free and open to the public.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/oas

Sponsored by the Organization of American States and the Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Program

Thursday, March 6, 2014
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Harry Harding Room 213
1957 E St NW

Japan's Diplomatic Catastrophe after Yasukuni: Is There a Way Out?


Ambassador Kazuhiko Togo (former) of Japan

Kazuhiko Togo, (Ph.D. 2009, Leiden University) is Professor and Director of the Institute for World Affairs, Kyoto Sangyo University since 2010. He served in the Japanese Foreign Ministry from 1968, working on Russia, the U.S., Europe, international law and economics, and retired in 2002 as Ambassador to the Netherlands. Since then, he has taught at universities in Leiden, Princeton, Tamkang (Taiwan), UC Santa Barbara, Seoul and Tokyo.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/yasukuni

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Thursday, March 6, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E St NW

Constructing the Narratives of Identity and Power: Self-Imagination in a Young Ukrainian Nation


Karina V. Korostelina, Associate Professor, George Mason University

Karina V. Korostelina's new book, Constructing the Narratives of Identity and Power, provides a comprehensive outlook on Ukraine through the views of intellectual and political elites. Based on extensive field work in Ukraine, Korostelina describes the complex process of nation building, revealing seven prevailing conceptual models of Ukraine and five dominant narratives of national identity. Korostelina describes the differences and conflicting elements of the national narratives that constitute the contested arena of nation-building in Ukraine and explains the current violence in the country.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Kkorostelina

Sponsored by the IERES

Thursday, March 6, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Elliott School, Room 505
1957 E Street NW

Turkey in Crisis? Transformations of the State and Civil Society


Joshua D. Hendrick, Loyola University of Maryland

Ihsan Dagi, SAIS, Johns Hopkins University

Bayram Balci, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Turkey has made the headlines recently for a number of issues, including accusations of corruption, controversial changes to the judiciary, restrictions on internet privacy, economic troubles, and protests against the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP). Join our esteemed panelists in a discussion on Turkey's shifting political dynamic and its implications for the country and its region.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Turkey

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (IERES)

Tuesday, March 11, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E St NW

CANCELED
Hollywood Exiles in Europe: The Blacklist and Cold War Historiography


Rebecca Prime, Hood College

What can the experiences of Hollywood's blacklisted exiles in Europe tell us about our understanding of the Cold War? Given the blacklist's significance as an icon of Cold War America, its absence from accounts of the cultural Cold War in Europe is striking, and reflects the perception of the Hollywood blacklist as a purely domestic phenomenon. The history of the blacklisted community in Europe discussed in this talk reveals the important transnational dimensions of the Hollywood blacklist. As American political exiles, the blacklisted in Europe were a provocation to CIA-sponsored cultural propaganda, while their films presented a counter canon to 1950s Hollywood domestic production, with its implicit attempt to win over hearts and minds to the American way of life.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Prime

Sponsored by the IERES

Wednesday, March 12, 2014
4:30 PM - 7:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E St NW

The Unique Role of the American University in Central Asia


Lynne Tracy, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Central Asia

Andrew Wachtel, President, AUCA

Andrew Wilder, Vice president of South & Central Asia programs, US Institute of Peace

After the American and NATO pullout from Afghanistan, AUCA will be one of the few remaining sustainable institutions in Central Asia promoting free and critical thought. The purpose of the event is to raise the level of awareness about AUCA and the unique role it plays in the wider Central Asian region.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/auca

Sponsored by the Central Asia Program

Thursday, March 13, 2014
11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

INMM Northeast Chapter Brown Bag Luncheon Meeting


The panel will include participants from NRC, DOE, industry, and non-governmental organizations.

The INMM NE Chapter is hosting a panel discussion on Nuclear Material Attractiveness. Current physical protection requirements at domestic civilian facilities are based solely on the quantity and isotopics of special nuclear material (SNM). The requirements are not truly risk-informed, as they do not take into account the chemical and physical form or the level of dilution, factors that impact the attractiveness of SNM to an adversary. The US, UK and France committed to have workshops and other interactions on the development of graded security programs, taking into account material attractiveness, at the Seoul Nuclear Security Summit in 2012. This panel discussion is a part of fulfilling that commitment.

RSVP: joseph.glaser@nnsa.doe.gov

Sponsored by the Nuclear Policy Talks and Institute of Nuclear Materials Management

Friday, March 14, 2014
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Explaining the Latest Developments in Ukraine


Sergiy Kudelia, Baylor University

Anders Aslund, Peterson Institute for International Economics

Matthew Rojansky, Kennan Institute

After three months of protests kicked off by former President Viktor Yanukovych's refusal to sign an Association Agreement with the European Union, Ukraine's parliament removed him from office and set new presidential elections for May. Shortly afterwards, Russia invaded Crimea, pouring thousands of troops across the international border to gain decisive control of the region. Please join us for a discussion of these issues and their subsequent developments, as well as the economic situation in Ukraine, and an analysis of the international response.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/Ukraine-Today

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (IERES)

Monday, March 17, 2014
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Between Salafists, Secularists, and Security Forces: The Politics of Tunisian Youth in the Age of Ennahda


Monica Marks, Tunisian-based Rhodes Scholar and Doctoral Candidate, St Antony's College, Oxford

William Lawrence, Visiting Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, George Washington University and Senior Fellow, Project on Middle East Democracy

Join POMEPS for a discussion of political Islam, youth politics, and the Tunisian constitution featuring Monica Marks with comments by William Lawrence.

Light refreshments will be available

RSVP: http://bit.ly/1koFHFi

Sponsored by the Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS)

Tuesday, March 18, 2014
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Monroe Hall, Room 321
2115 G Street, N.W.

Trade and Development Workshop


Chris Blattman, Assistant Professor, Political Science, School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University

Employing and Empowering Marginalized Women: A Cluster Randomized Trial of Microenterprise Assistance

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/tradeanddev20132014

Sponsored by Institute for International Economic Policy, G.W. Economics Department

Tuesday, March 18, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Gelman Library, Room 702
2130 H Street NW

Russian Rock Music Today


Artemyi Troitsky, professor and activist

Artemyi Troitsky is the world's leading expert on Russian rock music and an active player in the civic life of his country. He is the author of Back in the USSR: The True Story of Rock in Russia and Tusovka: Whatever Happened to the Soviet Underground Culture. He currently teaches in the Journalism Department of Moscow State University, hosts TV and radio shows (including on Ekho Moskvy), writes for Novaya gazeta, is a member of the board of Greenpeace Russia, and is a well-known blogger and opposition activist.

Reception to follow.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/TroitskyRock

Sponsored by IERES, Global Resources Center (GRC)

Tuesday, March 18, 2014
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E St NW

Justice Interrupted: The Struggle for Constitutional Government in the Middle East


Elizabeth Thompson, Associate Professor of History, University of Virginia

Please join us for a conversation with Dr. Elizabeth F. Thompson, associate professor of history at the University of Virginia, who will discuss her new book, Justice Interrupted: The Struggle for Constitutional Government in the Middle East (2013: Harvard University Press). Professor Thompson's new text traces the roots of the 2011 Arab Spring to the region's first constitutional movements of the late 19th century, when an earlier generation of revolutionaries fought for just government and the rule of law in a struggle against reactionary local elites and the interventions of foreign powers.

Free copies of the book will be available for students.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/thompson

Sponsored by the Institute for Middle East Studies, with the support of the US Department of Education's Title VI National Resource Center Grant for the Middle East

Tuesday, March 18, 2014
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Hall of Government, Room 104
710 21st Street, NW

Trade, Gender, and Politics: An Introduction to African Development


Yvonne Captain-Hidalgo, Associate Professor of Latin American Literature & Film and International Affairs, The George Washington University

Christiane Yelibi, Program Assistant, Vital Voices Global Partnership

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/africasir

Sponsored by the Sigma Iota Rho Honors Society for International Affairs

Thursday, March 20, 2014
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

City View Room, 7th Floor
1957 E Street NW

Cybersecurity - the Much Admired Problem


Dr. Leonard M. Napolitano, Jr., Director, Computer Sciences and Information Systems, Sandia National Laboratories

Frank J. Cilluffo, Associate Vice President and Director, Homeland Security Policy Institute, GW

Cyberspace, the ubiquitous fusion of information and communication technologies, has transformed the way that Americans work and play and has also markedly changed the U.S. national security landscape. Threats in and to cyberspace are causing anxiety at all levels in this country, encouraged by news of identity theft, intellectual property piracy, the Mandiant report on China's cyber activities against US institutions, and repeated warnings of an impending "cyber Pearl Harbor." A key issue is the fact that the cybersecurity problem is not well understood; it is much admired but not resolved. This talk will review the historical technical and policy drivers that created this hydra-headed beast, and their implications for cybersecurity. It will also provide a high-level overview of current cyber threats and attack objectives. The metaphor of public health will be used to posit approaches for significant containment of cybersecurity risk through scientific understanding, public "cyber hygiene," and their integration with national and international legal and policy frameworks.

This is part of the Technology, Policy, and National Security Series

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/snlcybersecurity

Sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories and Elliott School of International Affairs

Thursday, March 20, 2014
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Alumni House
1918 F Street, NW

Bottom-up Secularism in the Top-Down States of Eurasia


John Schoeberlein, Director, Eurasian Regional Studies, Nazarbayev University, Astana

The resurgence of religion in the post-Soviet space has been accompanied by heightened appeals to secularism as a social and political order. Most research on secularism in Eurasian contexts - and indeed, in general - has focused on the top-down institutional construction of the secular order. Furthermore, scholarship on post-Soviet societies tends often to present social construction as a largely top-down process; this being a legacy of the Soviet context where a state with high ambitions for penetrating and transforming society was at the center of most analysis of social process. John Schoeberlein will explore the ways in which bottom-up processes shape the formation of secularism in post-communist states. Drawing on an ethnographic perspective from field research in Central Asia and the Caucasus, he will make an argument that what might be called "secular sensibilities" of people who inhabit all levels of the social process are a crucial factor in shaping the ways that religion has assumed a new role in social and political processes.

RSVP: go.gwu.edu/Schoeberlein

Sponsored by the Central Asia Program and IERES

Thursday, March 20, 2014
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E St NW

The Security Archipelago: Human-Security States, Race/Sexuality Politics, and Social Militarization in Contemporary Egypt and Brazil


Paul Amar, Associate Professor of Global & International Studies, University of California - Santa Barbara

Dr. Paul Amar, will discuss his most recent book, The Security Archipelago (2013: Duke University Press). Professor Amar's research, publishing and teaching focus on state institutions, security regimes, social movements, and democratic transitions in the Middle East and Latin America, tracing the origins and intersections of new patterns of police militarization, security governance, race/sexuality politics, humanitarian intervention, and state restructuring in the mega-cities of the global south.

Free copies of the book are available for students.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/amar

Sponsored by the Institute for Middle East Studies, with the support of the US Department of Education's Title VI National Resource Center Grant for the Middle East

Thursday, March 20, 2014
6:15 PM - 8:00 PM

Harry Harding Auditorium, Room 213
1957 E Street NW

Brazil Forum: Brazil's Global Moment


Mauro Vieira, Ambassador of Brazil to the United States

For this long anticipated visit Ambassador Mauro Vieira will detail the latest in the Brazil-US relations and rising prominence of Brazil on the world stage as its most qualified spokesperson in DC.

Reception to follow from 7:15-8:00 PM

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/1bq

Sponsored by Brazil Initiative, Rising Powers Initiative, Ambassadors Forum

Thursday, March 20, 2014
6:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Elliott School, Room 505
1957 E Street NW

Cinema Club Film Screening: The Orator


Marlene Laruelle, research professor of international affairs

Film Screening the movie The Orator.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/orator

Sponsored by Central Asia Program

Friday, March 21, 2014
9:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Elliott School, Room 505
1957 E Street NW

International Water Day


Marlene Laruelle, Central Asia Program, George Washington University

Panelists:

Julia Collins, Program Officer, Women and Water Project
Marcus King, Associate Professor of International Affairs, George Washington University
Barbara Miller, Global Gender Program, George Washington University
Amanda Klasing, Women's Rights Division, Human Rights Watch
Rebecca Fishman, Operations and Special Projects Director, WASH Advocates
Kara Gerson, Executive Director, Voss Foundation

In 1993, the United Nations declared March 22nd as the official World Day for Water, with the aim to raise awareness and focus attention on sustainably managing this important resource. This year World Water Day focuses on the interplay of Energy and Water. In honor of this day, the State Department-funded Women and Water Project at GW's Elliott School, along with WASH Advocates, invite you to a roundtable breakfast event to discuss energy and water challenges and share knowledge on improving management and governance through enhanced participation of women and social inclusion.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/water

Sponsored by Central Asia Program, Global Gender Program

Friday, March 21, 2014
3:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Crisis in the Crimea Implications for Ukraine, Russia, and the West


Volodymyr Dubovyk, Odessa National University, Ukraine
Oleksandr Fisun, Kharkiv National University, Ukraine
Dmitry Gorenburg, CNA, Harvard University
Viatcheslav Morozov, University of Tartu, Estonia

Moderator: Cory Welt, The George Washington University

Russia's invasion of Ukraine and threat to annex the Crimea have grave implications for Ukraine, Russia, and Western policy toward the region. Please join this international panel to discuss Ukrainian reactions to the invasion and the country's political prospects; the logic of Russian actions; and implications for EU and US policy.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Crimea2014

Sponsored by PONARS Eurasia, the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Monday, March 24, 2014
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

China's Foreign Aid and the International Aid Regime


Shino Watanabe, Associate Professor, Saitama University, Japan

Professor Watanabe will give a brief overview of China's foreign aid and identify its major characteristics. Second, she will examine major challenges and contributions of China's foreign aid to the international donor community and, if time allows, to recipient countries.

This event is open to the public

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/chinaforeignaid

Sponsored by the Institute for Global and International Studies (IGIS), and the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Monday, March 24, 2014
4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Nuclear Policy Talk: Challenges facing the Department of Energy: Stockpile Stewardship and Nuclear Modernization


Parney Albright, Director (2009-2013), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Dr. Parney Albright served as Director of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from 2009 - 2013. As director, he was responsible for the management of the Laboratory and also served as President of Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. Dr. Albright has extensive experience in executive leadership; policy direction; strategic planning; Congressional and Executive branch interactions; financial and personnel management of large mission-focused science and technology organizations; and research, development, testing, and evaluation of national security technologies and systems. He has a broad and deep understanding of U.S. and international civilian and military requirements, functions, and processes in the national security arena.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/albrightNPT

Sponsored by The Nuclear Policy Talks and the Center for International Science and Technology Policy

Monday, March 24, 2014
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Elliott School, Room 113
1957 E St NW

What you need to know to become a diplomat


Ambassador Edward "Skip" Gnehm Jr., Former US Ambassador, Kuwait Professor of Gulf and Arabian Peninsula Affairs, Director, Middle East Policy Forum, GW

Ambassador Richard Kauzlarich, Former US Ambassador, Non-resident senior fellow, Brookings Institute, Deputy Director, TraCCC, School of Public Policy, George Mason University

Our esteemed guests will share their valuable insight, amazing stories and first hand experiences with the audience. Come ready to ask questions and find out more about what it means to be a diplomat!

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/diplomat

Sponsored by the DPE Professional Foreign Service Fraternity

Tuesday, March 25, 2014
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Elliott School, Room 505
1957 E Street NW

Palestine: Childhood Denied


Sulieman Mleahat, Education Program Manager, American Near East Refugee Aid (ANERA)

ANERA Education Program Manager Sulieman Mleahat talks about the challenges to early childhood development for Palestinian children and strategies for improvement in the areas of teacher training, curriculum development, school infrastructure, literacy, parenting and health and nutrition.

RSVP: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1ydyDbrXQPYfVfzjdHBxdQDRHrlHRFJ0_2skSuQ1zdm8/viewform

Sponsored by the Institute for Middle East Studies, The Middle East Policy Forum, ExxonMobil

Tuesday, March 25, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Voesar 4th Floor
1957 E Street NW

Are U.S. strategic interests in Azerbaijan at risk?


Dr. Farhad Aliyev, Fulbright Visiting Scholar at the Central Asia-Caucasus Institute

The current US policy of disengagement from Southern Eurasia may have a negative impact upon the US strategic interests in the region in the long-run, with Azerbaijan becoming more vulnerable to falling under Russia's influence and having to manage a difficult relationship to Iran. Moreover, domestic evolutions are on their way: rollback in democratization and the influence of changes in values among the youth, especially under the influence of Turkey's internal changes, may make the US position in the country more difficult.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/azeri

Sponsored by Central Asia Program

Wednesday, March 26, 2014
9:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Media and Public Affairs, B07
805 21st Street NW

A Window Into Women of the Arab Spring: Progress or Reversals?


Hebah Abdalla, Senior Producer, Al-Jazeera English

Sahar Atrache, Senior Analyst for Lebanon, International Crisis Group

Isobel Coleman, Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations

Thomas Gorguissian, Editor, Al-Ahram

Gini Reticker, Filmmaker, "Awakening"

As part of Women's History Month, the Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication and the Institute for Middle East Studies will host a panel discussion to examine the complex question of how women have fared since the promising beginning of the Arab Spring three years ago. With a focus on Egypt and how the political situation affects women and girls across the Middle East and North Africa, the discussion will also touch on development, education, human rights, constitutional changes, and inclusiveness.

In addition to the panel, two film previews will be presented:
Women and Girls Lead - A three-minute film about the Independent Television Service's strategic media campaign, Women and Girls Lead, which supports and sustains a growing movement to empower them, their communities, and future generations.

Awakening - Produced by Fork Films, Awakening is part of Women and Girls Lead, a 50-film multi-year commitment to spark and sustain a global conversation about gender equality and life up women and girls worldwide. The three-minute preview shows a groundbreaking multimedia initiative featuring women of the Middle East and North Africa in their continuing quest to realize the goals of the 2011 revolutions.

RSVP: http://arabspringwomen.eventbrite.com

Sponsored by Walter Roberts Endowment, Institute for Middle East Studies, and the Institute for Public D

Wednesday, March 26, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E St NW

Shevchenko on the Maidan: Ukraine's Past, Present, and Future


Peter Fedynsky, Voice of America

Victor Stepanenko, Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences

Yaroslav Pylynski, Kennan Institute (Kiev Office)

During the demonstrations on Maidan Square, portraits of Taras Shevchenko, Ukraine's greatest poet, featured prominently. Shevchenko signifies Ukrainian freedom, unity, and pride. This year marks the 200th anniversary of Taras Shevchenko's birth. This event will host a panel of experts on Ukraine to discuss Shevchenko's role in Ukrainian identity, culture and society.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Shevchenko

Sponsored by the IERES

Wednesday, March 26, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Elliott School, Room 111
1957 E St NW

Separated Plutonium: Friend or Foe?


Andrew Worrall, Senior Reactor Design and Analysis Engineer, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Today there is approximately 500 metric tons of separated civil and weapons plutonium in the world, and that stockpile continues to grow. In addition, there is a further 240,000 metric tons of spent fuel, containing a further ~2,500 metric tons of plutonium. But is this material an asset, or a liability; friend or foe? This talk will describe some of the key available options for managing this material going forward, focusing on the potential reactor based disposition strategies being considered, particularly for the UK's separated Pu, which currently stands as the largest civil stockpile in the world. The seminar will present not only the technical assessments, but also will consider the non-proliferation and economic evaluations, and will also highlight the key strategic considerations.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/plutonium

Sponsored by the Institute for Nuclear Studies

Wednesday, March 26, 2014
7:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Elliott School, Room 505
1957 E Street NW

East and South China Sea Disputes: Implications for Regional and US Security


Robert Sutter, Professor of Practice of International Affairs, GW

Dan Blumenthal, Director of Asian Studies, American Enterprise Institute

Please join Global China Connection and OAS for a conversation between Daniel Blumenthal and Professor Robert Sutter on East and South China Sea territorial disputes and the implications they present for regional and US security. Don't miss this exciting event on a topic at the forefront of Asian affairs and U.S. foreign policy in the region.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/1e2

Sponsored by the Global China Connection, Organization of Asia Studies, SIGUR

Thursday, March 27, 2014
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Political Risks in Brazil


Joao Augusto Castro Neves, Director, Brazil and Latin America, Eurasia Group

Brazil's rise has led to the country being put under increased scrutiny in meeting ever increasing expectations. The specific political risks and how they fit within the global context will be explained by Joao Castro Neves a Director at the world's top Political Risk firm: Eurasia Group.

Beverages provided

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/1br

Sponsored by Brazil Initiative

Thursday, March 27, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Power and Muslim Orthodoxy in Kyrgyzstan


Aurélie Biard, Centre for International Studies and Research (CERI)

Using case studies, this presentation will explore the effects of the interventions by the central and local authorities into struggles to define Muslim orthodoxy in Kyrgyzstan, as well as how these interventions shape the conditions in which Muslims are able to express their faith. The norms linked to the diverse attempts at defining orthodoxy in Kyrgyzstan tend to be freely appropriated by individuals. Each individual thus feels some sort of mastery in the use that he or she makes of religion as an identity marker.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Biard

Sponsored by IERES

Thursday, March 27, 2014
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Elliott School, Room 505
1957 E St NW

Thermonuclear Monarchy: Choosing Between Democracy and Doom


Elaine Scarry, Walter M. Cabot Professor of Aesthetics and the General Theory of Value, Harvard University

Elaine Scarry demonstrates that the power of one leader to obliterate millions of people with a nuclear weapon - a possibility that remains very real even in the wake of the Cold War - deeply violates our constitutional rights, undermines the social contract, and is fundamentally at odds with the deliberative principles of democracy.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/thermonuclear

Sponsored by the Center for International Science and Technology Policy

Thursday, March 27, 2014
7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Elliott School, Room 505
1957 E Street NW

IDS Alumni Series Presents: Careers in Non-Profit Organizations


Cara Hayes, Associate Director, New Business Services, Winrock International

Danielle Roth, Technical Coordinator, Youth Programs, ChildFund

Katie Appel, Program Associate, Labor, Education, Economic Empowerment, & Protection, Plan International USA

Join us for an IDS Alumni Series event on working at an NGO in international development. Recently graduated IDS alumni will discuss challenges and opportunities associated with working at an NGO, provide career tips and talk about how they began working for their respective organizations.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/idsalumningos

Sponsored by the International Development Studies Program

Friday, March 28, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Old Main Building, Conference Room 219
1922 F Street, NW

Polar Peoples: Migration and Population Change in the Arctic


Timothy Heleniak, GW Department of Geography

There are just over four million people residing in the Arctic according to the definition of the Arctic used by the Arctic Human Development Report. These four million people live in a variety of different settlements ranging from small coastal villages where the local economy is based on subsistence hunting to large cities based on resource extraction. The different Arctic regions are composed of a combination of indigenous people who have lived in the region for millennia and outsiders who have migrated to the regions more recently. This talk examines historical patterns of migration in the Arctic, recent patterns of fertility and mortality and the ethnic, age, and gender composition of the Arctic regions. Special attention is given to the impact of migration because of its outsized influence on the small populations and settlements in the Arctic. The influence of economic factors, climate change, and the role of the state on migration and settlement patterns is examined in detail.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/arcticpeople

Sponsored by IERES, GW Department of Geography

Monday, March 31, 2014
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Contestation and Adaptation: The Politics of National Identity in China


Dr. Enze Han, Lecturer, Department of Politics and International Studies, SOAS, University of London

Simmering grievances and occasional outbursts of social unrest among ethnic minority populations in China challenge not only the ruling party's legitimacy and governance, but also contemporary Chinese national identity and the territorial integrity of the Chinese state. However, of the fifty-five ethnic minority groups in China, only the Tibetans and Uyghurs have forcefully contested the idea of a Chinese national identity. Tackling this question, Dr. Han compares the way five major ethnic minority groups in China negotiate their national identities with the Chinese nation-state: Uyghurs, Chinese Koreans, Dai, Mongols, and Tibetans

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/chinaminorities

Sponsored by Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Monday, March 31, 2014
6:00 PM - 7:15 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Leadership in International Affairs: Lessons Learned with Robert Gallucci


Robert L. Gallucci, President, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation; Former Deputy Executive Chairman, UN Special Commission

Michael E. Brown, Dean, Elliott School of International Affairs, GW
(moderating)

Dr. Gallucci will discuss his experiences with UNSCOM and the disarmament of Iraq in 1991 and how the lessons learned from that experience can be applied to current events and crises.

Reception: 7:15 - 8:00 PM

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/GallucciLessonsLearned

Sponsored by Elliott School of International Affairs