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April 2013

Monday, April 1, 2013
6:00 PM - 7:15 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Book Event: Iraq in Wartime: Soldiering, Martyrdom, and Remembrance


Dina Khoury, Associate Professor of History and International Affairs, GWU

<i>Iraq in Wartime: Soldiering, Martyrdom, and Remembrance</i> traces the political, social, and cultural processes of the normalization of war during the last two decades of Bathist rule. Beginning with the Iran-Iraq War and continuing through the First Gulf War and sanctions, Dina Khoury probes the far-reaching ramifications of constant war on the Iraqi peoples politics, cultural imagination, and daily lives. She argues that war was a form of everyday bureaucratic governance, and examines the Iraqi governments policies of creating consent, managing resistance and religious diversity, and shaping public culture.<br/><br/>
Dina Khoury is associate professor of history and international affairs at The George Washington University. Since 2005, she has been writing on the contemporary history of Iraq, particularly violence, sectarian politics, and war and memory. She is author of <i>State and Provincial Society in the Ottoman Empire</i> Cambridge, 1997).

**A limited number of books will be available for GW students**

RSVP: http://www.google.com/url?q=http://tinyurl.com/mepf4-01&sa=D&usg=ALhdy2-bzAGw-Z2L5QQ9XVkhRVbZCG4CWw

Sponsored by the Middle East Policy Forum (MEPF): The Middle East Policy Forum is presented with the generous support of ExxonMobil

Tuesday, April 2, 2013
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM

State Room, 7th Floor
1957 E Street NW

Nuclear Policy Talks: Reducing the Risk From Radioactive and Nuclear Materials


GW's Elliott School of International Affairs and the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) are pleased to invite you to the seventh in a series of workshops on Reducing the Risk from Radioactive and Nuclear Materials. The workshop will start with panel sessions discussing Nuclear and Radiological Security Culture under INFCIRC/225/Revision 5 and other IAEA Nuclear Security Series documents from four different aspects: (1) Regulatory Frameworks, (2) Performance Testing, (3) Implementing Nuclear and Radiological Security Culture Against Insider Threats, and (4) Human Capacity Building.
<br/><br/>
Participants will hear presentations by invited panelists.  Participants will also participate in nonattribution discussions about alternatives and priorities for addressing the challenges to successful implementation and development of Nuclear Security Culture.

Participants must register through INMM. Interested students should contact Christina Walrond, ccwalrond@gwu.edu, for assistance with registration fees.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/INMM

Sponsored by the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) and GW's Nuclear Policy Talks

Tuesday, April 2, 2013
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Book Event: Globalizing Central Asia: Geopolitics and Challenges of Economic Development


Marlene Laruelle, Research Professor of International Affairs, GWU

Sebastien Peyrouse, Research Professor of International Affairs, GWU

Johannes Linn, Former World Bank Vice President for Europe and Central Asia

Central Asia, as it emerges from a political and economic system that was closed until the end of the twentieth century, is a textbook case for globalization. The book <i>Globalizing Central Asia: Geopolitics and Challenges of Economic Development</i> traces the region's entry into the highly competitive global
arena, not only through state interaction with numerous external players, but also in geo-economic terms. The region's natural resources compel the attention of rivalrous great powers and ambitious internal factions. Russia and China dominate the horizon, with other global players close behind. The local regimes are caught between the need for international collaborations to valorize their
resources and the need to maintain control over them in the interest of state sovereignty. Local patterns of development thus become a key driver of external actors' involvement and shape the mechanisms by which the Central Asian states are forging a place for themselves in the globalized world.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/globalizing

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Affairs (IERES)

Wednesday, April 3, 2013
6:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Muslim Nationalists and the New Turks


Jenny White, Associate Professor and Director, Undergraduate Studies, Anthropology Department, Boston University

Jenny White is an associate professor and director of undergraduate studies in the anthropology department at Boston University. She is the former president of the Turkish Studies Association and of the American Anthropological Association Middle East Section, and sits on the board of the Institute of Turkish Studies. She is the author of <i>Islamist Mobilization in Turkey: A Study in Vernacular Politics</i> (2002, winner of the 2003 Douglass Prize for best book in Europeanist anthropology) and <i>Money Makes Us Relatives: Women's Labor in Urban Turkey</i> (second edition, London: Routledge, 2004). She also has written three historical novels set in 19th century Istanbul, <i>The Sultan's Seal</i> (2006), <i>The Abyssinian Proof</i> (2008), and <i>The Winter Thief</i> (2010).<br/><br/>
She will be discussing her most recent book: <i>Muslim Nationalists and the New Turks</i>.

*A book signing and wine reception will follow. Limited copies of the book will be available for GW students.*

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/afppzwu

Sponsored by the Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS

Thursday, April 4, 2013
12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

Suite 503
1957 E Street NW

Market Access in China  Challenges in U.S.-China Relations


Julia Coym, Visiting Scholar, Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Join Visiting Scholar Julia Coym for a discussion on market access challenges and their impact on U.S.-China relations. U.S. companies are eager to do business in China's growing market, but China has been slow to open sectors it deems strategic, to foreign investment. Lacking transparency, ambiguous regulations and discriminatory application of laws make it difficult for foreign businesses to compete with state-supported companies in China. As Chinese companies in turn strive to compete with U.S. companies in the U.S. market, this issue is likely to become an even greater focus in U.S.-China relations.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/julia

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Thursday, April 4, 2013
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

*NEW LOCATION: Lindner Family Commons, Room 602*
1957 E Street NW

The Changing System of International Relations and Its Impact on U.S.-Russian Relations


Igor S. Ivanov, Former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Russian Federation President, Russian International Affairs Council

In this presentation, Igor Ivanov will describe and assess the key drivers of change in the international system of politics. He will then explain how these changes are affecting the evolving U.S. - Russian relationship. The talk will address the key events of the last several months that have defined the broader
international context and the particular bilateral relationship between the U.S. and Russia.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Ivanov

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Affairs (IERES)

Thursday, April 4, 2013
6:00 PM - 7:15 PM

*NEW LOCATION: Harry Harding Auditorium, Room 213*
1957 E Street NW

U.S. Foreign Policy: The Next Four Years


Maurice Mickey East, Dean, School of Public and International Affairs, GW (1985-1987); Dean, School of International Affairs, GW (1987-1988); Dean, Elliott School of International Affairs, GW (1988-1994)

Harry Harding, Dean, Elliott School of International Affairs, GW (1995-2005)

Michael E. Brown, Dean, Elliott School of International Affairs, GW (2005-Present)

Moderated by:
Hope M. Harrison, Associate Professor of History and International Affairs

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/ThreeDeans

Sponsored by the Elliott School of International Affairs

Thursday, April 4, 2013
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Dorothy Betts Marvin Theatre
800 21st Street NW

The Tibetan Code of Happiness


Khenpo Sodargye, Larung Gar Buddhist Academy

Happiness free from suffering and the seeds of suffering is the fundamental goal of Buddhist practice. Khenpo Sodargye will share his insights on the topic based on his latest publication, <i>Living through Suffering</i> 2012).

RSVP: aviv@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the GWU Department of Religion and the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Friday, April 5, 2013
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Geography Department Conference Room
1922 F Street NW

Findings from the Deep Borehole Research at Lake Vostok, Antarctica


Vladimir Kotlyakov, Institute of Geography, Russian Academy of Sciences

Lake Vostok lies more than 11,000 feet below the surface of Antarctica. In 2012, Russian scientists succeeded in drilling a borehole into the lake, whose water has been isolated for 15 million to 25 million years. The overlying ice provides a record of the earths climate over the last 400,000 years. Russian scientists are currently analyzing water from the lake in search for life forms. Vladimir Kotlyakov has been intimately involved with the project since its beginning and will discuss the latest results.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Kotlyakov

Sponsored by the GW Geography Department

Friday, April 5, 2013
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

Room 505
1957 E Street NW

Book Launch: Double Paradox: Rapid Growth and Rising Corruption in China


Andrew Wedeman, Professor of Political Science, Georgia State University

According to conventional wisdom, rising corruption reduces economic growth. And yet, between 1978 and 2010, even as officials were looting state coffers, extorting bribes, raking in kickbacks, and scraping off rents at unprecedented rates, the Chinese economy grew at an average annual rate of 9 percent. In <em>Double Paradox</em>, Andrew Wedeman seeks to explain why the Chinese economy performed so well despite widespread corruption at almost kleptocratic levels.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/wedeman

Sponsored by the Rising Powers Initiative's Asian Economic Challenges Series

Monday, April 8, 2013
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

The Kurdish Perspective: Iraq, Syria, Turkey, and Beyond


H.E. Fuad Hussein, Chief of Staff to President Barzani

H.E. Falah Bakir, Minister, Head of the Department of Foreign Relations

H.E. Qubad Talabani, Minister, Head of the Department of Coordination and Follow-up

Moderated by:
Ambassador Edward Gnehm, Director of the Middle East Policy Forum

Pal Arne Davidsen, Ambassador Stuart Fellow at IERES

On April 9, 2003, the statue of Iraqi president Saddam Hussein in Baghdad's Firdos Square was toppled.  Ten years after Iraqs liberation, not all is well in the country, although the Kurdistan Region has indeed been liberated from Saddams rule and is thriving more than ever.  Senior members of the Kurdistan Regional Government will discuss the current political stalemate in Iraq, including natural resources disputes and security confrontations in the Disputed Internal Boundaries.  They will also provide their perspective on other regional developments, including the situation in Syria, as well as prospects for conflict resolution in Turkey.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/KRG

Sponsored by The Middle East Policy Forum and the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (IERES)

Monday, April 8, 2013
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Challenges to Land Tenure & Food Security: Lessons and Proposed Solutions Drawing from World Bank Financed Land Administration Programs in Cambodia and Guatemala


Tep Vanny, Boeung Kak Community Leader, Cambodia

Yun Mane, Cambodian Indigenous Youth Association

Bayron Milián, Professor, University of San Carlos, Guatemala

Natalie Bugalski, Legal Associate, Inclusive Development International

Moderator:
Ingrid Hoven (invited), Executive Director, World Bank, Germany

Speakers will review the experiences of indigenous, farming, and urban poor communities in Cambodia and Guatemala with World Bank funded land administration programs. They will highlight negative effects on inequality and the poor, draw lessons to address these weaknesses, and propose new social safeguard measures on tenure to fully protect the land, housing, and natural resource rights of poor, vulnerable, and marginalized groups, and promote more equitable tenure systems.

RSVP: http://challenges-land-tenure-food-security.eventbrite.com/

Sponsored by Oxfam America, ActionAid, GW's IDS Program, and Heinrich Böll Stiftung North America

Monday, April 8, 2013
4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Belarus and the Neighborhood: Where is Democracy Possible?


Alexei Pikulik, Lecturer in Political Science, EHU; Academic Director, Belarusian Institute for Strategic Studies; Professor, European University, St. Petersburg

Virginijus Valentinavicius, Head of Social and Political Sciences, European Humanities University

In his presentation, "Making Autocracy Work: Why is Belarus' Political Regime Stable?" Alexei Pikulik will provide a comparative perspective in defining the key factors leading both to the consolidation of political autocracy and a socialist-mixed economy in Belarus in the 1990s and to the stability of the Lukashenko regime. The speaker will discuss some structural weaknesses of the opposition, assess Western efforts to promote democratization, and suggest some potential pathways and scenarios for change. Virginijus Valentinavicius will discuss "Promoting Democracy in an Autocratic Neighbor: Belarus, Lithuania, and the EU." He will address the policy choices and problems that Lithuania has confronted in its efforts to promote democratization in Belarus. The speaker will examine the balance Lithuania has sought to strike between adherence to the EU's sanction-centered approach, on the one hand, and the need to sustain at least a minimal dialogue with a neighbor, on the other. He will also address why Lithuania's efforts to mediate on the EU's behalf are gradually losing leverage as Russia has become increasingly assertive in the region.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Belarus

Sponsored by the European Humanities University

Monday, April 8, 2013
7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

International Internships


Have you ever considered interning abroad, but are unsure of your ability to do so? This panel will feature AISEC, an international leadership development organization, who will discuss internship opportunities for GW students abroad. The event will also include student discussions of their personal experiences working abroad.

Informal networking session to follow.

No RSVP needed.

Sponsored by SIR, DPE, AISEC

Tuesday, April 9, 2013
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM


1025 F Street NW, Suite 800

Ukraine: Democracy in Danger?


Nadia Diuk, National Endowment for Democracy

Serhiy Kudelia, Baylor University

Steven Pifer, Brookings Institution

Christopher Walker, International Forum for Democratic Studies

Since its Orange Revolution in 2004, Ukraine has confronted difficult obstacles to developing durable democratic institutions. In the most recent period, the very institutions in Ukraine that had distinguished themselves in the non-Baltic post-Soviet context - news media, civil society, and elections - have come under increasing pressure by the authorities. The troubling direction of Ukraine's governance has implications for the country's development of accountable and transparent institutions at home, as well as beyond its borders, including the nature of its fragile relationship with the European Union. The experts on this panel will examine the key issues facing Ukraine at a time when the country is moving in the direction of less democratic accountability.<br/><br/>
This event is being held in conjunction with the release of the forthcoming issue of Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization that is devoted to Ukraine.

RSVP: http://ukrainedemocracyindanger.eventbrite.com/

Sponsored by International Forum for Democratic Studies

Wednesday, April 10, 2013
8:30 AM - 3:30 PM

City View Room, 7th Floor
1957 E Street NW

IMES 6th Annual Conference: Political Economy and the Foundations of Regional Change


Pete Moore, Associate Professor, Political Science, Case Western Reserve University

Karen Pfeifer, Professor Emeriti, Smith College

Toby Jones, Associate Professor, History, Rutgers University

Michael Herb, Associate Professor and Director of Middle East Institute, Georgia State University

Mary Ann Tetreault, Una Chapman Cox Distinguished Professor, International Affairs and Political Science, Trinity University

Omar Dahi, Assistant Professor, Economics, Hampshire College

Bassam Haddad, Assistant Professor and Director, the Middle East Studies Program, George Mason University

Arang Keshavarzian, Associate Professor, Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies, New York University

Keynote by:
Roger Owen, A.J. Meyer Professor, Middle East History, Harvard University

Moderated by:
Marc Lynch, Director, Institute for Middle East Studies, George Washington University

Shana Marshall, Associate Director and Research Instructor, Institute for Middle East Studies, George Washington University

Nathan Brown, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, George Washington University

This interdisciplinary conference will bring together a diverse group of Middle East scholars from across the U.S. to discuss empirical and theoretical issues related to the contemporary Middle East political economy.  Each panelist will present a unique think-piece that outlines how he or she is addressing these issues through their own research agendas  and how the field of regional political economy has changed in the wake of the Arab uprisings.

Coffee and a light breakfast will be served.
A light lunch will also be served.

Please RSVP by Friday, April 5.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/chrhzo8

Sponsored by the Institute for Middle East Studies, The Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS), and the Middle East Policy Forum (MEPF)

Wednesday, April 10, 2013
1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

2013 Undergraduate Scholars Final Presentations


<strong><i>Presentation Schedule</i></strong><br>
<i>1:00 to 1:30 pm</i><br>
<strong>Beyond the Veil of the "State": Case Studies from Costa Rica and Peru</strong><br>
Gloriana Sojo-Lara (Faculty Advisor: Prof. Elizabeth Chacko)<br>
Preston Whitt (Faculty Advisor: Prof. Cynthia McClintock)<br>
Moderator: Soledad Feal-Zubimendi (Graduate Student Mentor)<br><br>
 
<i>1:35 to 2:20 pm</i><br>
<strong>Conflict and the State: Assessing Reintegration, State Failure, and Governability</strong><br>
Andrew Detsch (Faculty Advisor: Prof. Paul Williams)<br>
Carly Nuttall (Faculty Advisor: Prof. Alex Downes)<br>
Vriddhi Sujan (Faculty Advisor: Prof. Christina Fink)<br>
Moderator: Janene Sawers (Graduate Student Mentor)<br><br>
 
<i>2:30 to 3:00 pm</i><br>
<strong>Two Years Later: Challenges and Successes of the Arab Spring</strong><br>
Courtney Joline (Faculty Advisor: Prof. Nathan Brown)<br>
Elizabeth Marsh (Faculty Advisor: Prof. Nathan Brown)<br>
Moderator: Felicia Rodriguez (Graduate Student Mentor)<br><br>
 
<i>3:10 to 4:10 pm</i><br>
<strong>Dragon or Panda:
Implications of China's Rise on Chinese Domestic and Foreign Affairs</strong><br>
Nathaniel Austin (Faculty Advisor: Dean Mike Mochizuki)<br>
Alex Loo (Faculty Advisor: Prof. Sean Roberts)<br>
Rebekah Yurco (Faculty Advisor: Prof. Bruce Dickson)<br>
Li Zheng (Faculty Advisor: Prof. Robert Shepherd)<br>
Moderator: Sabrina Cao (Graduate Student Mentor)<br><br>
 
<i>4:15 to 5:00 pm</i><br>
<strong>China at the Periphery: Relations with Japan, Vietnam, and Taiwan</strong><br>
Kyle Churchman (Faculty Advisor: Prof. Robert Sutter)<br>
Thomas Fantis (Faculty Advisor: Dean Mike Mochizuki)<br>
Ryan Waye (Faculty Advisor: Prof. Robert Sutter)<br>
Moderator: Prof. Robert Sutter (Faculty Advisor)<br>

Wednesday, April 10, 2013
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Understanding Polyphony: Ukraine's Fluid Identity/ies


Tanya Zaharchenko, University of Cambridge

Todays conventional wisdom on Ukraine as a deeply divided country, trapped in a post-Soviet cultural crisis of East versus West, maintains a firm hold not only on popular imagination, but on some scholars as well. Comparing and contrasting Ukraine's diverse regional experiences in light of memory studies, this talk explores national identity/ies in the country today, especially those known as "fluid". Positioning multiculturalism as an asset rather than a fault, we'll interrogate the notion of (im)proper Ukrainians in favour of a nuanced and historicized approach.

RSVP: http://www.google.com/url?q=http://go.gwu.edu/zaharchenko&sa=D&usg=ALhdy2-NEbtdHdTue7smWCOMvIEEwGmDkg

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Affairs (IERES)

Wednesday, April 10, 2013
4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Suite 501
1957 E Street NW

Perspectives on Global Development


Mario Pezzini, Director, Development Center, Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development

Focusing on the OECDs latest publication, <i>Perspectives on Global Development</i>, Mr. Pezzini will discuss the phenomenon of shifting wealth  i.e. the shift of the global economic center of gravity towards the East and South and the renewed interest in industrial policies in emerging economies as a way to sustain growth and attain more inclusive development patterns.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/gwuoecd

Sponsored by the Latin American & Hemispheric Studies Program (LAHSP), International Development Studeis (IDS), the Organization for International Development (OID), and the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)

Wednesday, April 10, 2013
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Energy Developments in the Persian Gulf


Bijan Khajehpour,Managing Partner, Atieh International

Siamak Namazi, General Manager, Access Consulting Group

Moderator: Ambassador Edward Skip Gnehm, Director, Middle East Policy Forum, GW

As Iraq reemerges as a major oil producer after years of domestic turmoil, Iran continues to develop its petroleum sector despite economic sanctions. Focusing on energy sectors in Iran and Iraq, the panelists will discuss the influence of energy developments on regional relations. They will also highlight important trends in regional oil production and consumption.

Dr. Bijan Khajehpour is a managing and founding partner of Atieh International, a Vienna-based management consulting firm, and holds a Ph.D. in Business Administration from the International School of Management in Paris. Siamak Namazi is the general manager of Access Consulting Group, a Dubai-based private regional consultancy, and holds a MBA from the London Business School and a MS in Urban and Regional Planning from Rutgers University.

The Middle East Policy Forum is presented with the generous support of ExxonMobil.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/mepf4-10

Sponsored by the Middle East Policy Forum

Thursday, April 11, 2013
11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Examining Violence Against Women in India: Changes, Challenges and Futures


Kavita Daiya, Assistant Professor, Department of English, GW

Deepa Ollapally, Associate Research Professor of International Affairs; Associate Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Mary Ellsberg (panelist), Director, Global Women's Institute, GW

Zain Lakhani (panelist), Graduate Fellow, University of Pennsylvania

Daniel Moshenberg (panelist), Director, Women's Studies, Associate Professor of English, GW

Aruna Rao (panelist), Practitioner-in-Residence, Global Gender Program, Institute of Global and International Studies, GW

The issue of violence against women in India was catapulted into international visibility with the remarkable media coverage of the gang-rape and subsequent death of medical student in Delhi that took place on December 16, 2012. This panelist discussion will attempt to tackle such questions as: Why do women in India continue to suffer sexual and gender violence, arguably to increasing degrees? What are the mechanisms available for prevention, and what are the failures that sustain India's rape culture? What are the cultural, economic and political issues at stake?

Refreshments will be offered.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/genderviolence

Sponsored by the Rising Powers Initiative's Asian Economic Challenges series, the Global Gender Program, the Global Women's Institute, and the Department of Women's Studies

Thursday, April 11, 2013
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Russia's Snow Revolution: Game Over or Still Reason for Hope?


Stefan Hedlund, Uppsala University

Russia's Winter of Discontent triggered hopes that a snow revolution might be in the making. For a while it did look as though the regime was going to retreat. But today, little remains of such hopes. The next window of opportunity is not likely to arrive before 2018. The remaining question is if there has been a sufficient shift in values and expectations to warrant optimism about true change the next time around.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Hedlund

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Affairs (IERES)

Thursday, April 11, 2013
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Islamists and the State - A Conversation with Stacey Philbrick Yadav


Stacey Philbrick Yadav, Assistant Professor, Political Science, Hobart and William Smith Colleges

Stacey Philbrick Yadav is an assistant professor of political science at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, specializing in comparative politics of the Middle East. Her research focuses on the role of Islamist organizations in the transformation of public spheres, concentrating on research in Lebanon, Yemen, Egypt, and Israel.

She will be discussing her new book <i>Islamists and the State</i>.

A book signing and wine reception will follow. Limited copies of the book will be available for GW students.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/d857fap

Sponsored by the Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS)

Friday, April 12, 2013
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

State Room, 7th Floor
1957 E Street NW

New Perspective for the Asia Pacific


Annette Lu, Former Vice President of Taiwan

The Sigur Center for Asian Studies presents former Vice President of Taiwan, Annette Lu. Ms. Lu will deliver a speech which will be followed by a 30 minute Q&A session with the audience.

RSVP: *This event has reached capacity. To add yourself to the wait-list, click here: http://bit.ly/ZJGofz*

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Monday, April 15, 2013
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Elections in de facto States: Abkhazia, Nagorno-Karabakh, and Transnistria


Donnacha Ó Beacháin, Dublin City University

This presentation will chart the development of electoral politics in post-Soviet, unrecognized, or partially recognized, de facto states. In particular, it examines presidential elections in Abkhazia (August 2011), Transnistria (December 2011), and Nagorno-Karabakh (July 2012) with a complementary focus on parliamentary elections in Abkhazia (2007, 2012). The analysis is framed by scores of interviews conducted within Abkhazia, Transnistria, and Nagorno-Karabakh, as well as in the states from which they separated.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Obeachain

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Affairs (IERES)

Tuesday, April 16, 2013
9:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Amphitheater, 3rd Floor
800 21st St NW

Hillary Clinton and Global Women's Issues: An Enduring Legacy?


Melanne Verveer, former U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women's Issues

Donald Steinberg, Deputy Administrator, USAID

Join us at IPDGC as our keynote speakers and a panel of experts weigh the impact of former Secretary of State Hillary Clintons emphasis on gender equality and womens empowerment.  What institutional changes took place? What new initiatives were launched?  Did the U.S. effectively benefit from the soft power of Secretary Clintons long association with this issue?  What has been the global impact?  And what can we anticipate in the future?

Coffee Service at 8:30am

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/ipdgcHillary

Sponsored by the Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication

Tuesday, April 16, 2013
3:00 PM - 7:30 PM

City View Room, 7th Floor
1957 E Street, NW

American and European Policies in Central Asia: Similarities and Divergences


Marlene Laruelle, Director of the Central Asia Program, GW

Jos Boonstra, Senior Researcher, Head of EUCAM programme, FRIDE

Alexander Cooley, Tow Professor, Barnard College, New York

Jeff Goldstein, Senior Policy Analyst for Eurasia, Open Society Foundations

Sebastien Peyrouse, Research Professor, GWU

Frederic Grare, Director and Senior Associate South Asia Program, Carnegie

Patricia Flor, EU Special Representative for Central Asia, European External Action Service, Brussels

Lynne Tracy, Deputy Assistant Secretary for South and Central Asian Affairs

The seminar aims to build on the existing dialogue among experts and policy-makers from the two sides of the Atlantic, with the goal of finding pragmatic policy solutions and converging the objectives of the two actors in the region. While there is a general consensus that the objectives of Europe and the U.S in Central Asia are similar, the methodologies in perusing those objectives differ. What are the priorities of the two actors in the run up to 2014 and beyond in the view of the value-based approach versus security constraints linked to the 2014 draw-down from Afghanistan.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/April16-CAP

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Affairs (IERES) and the Central Asia Program

Tuesday, April 16, 2013
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Perspectives on Russia and Eurasia from Outside the Euro-Atlantic World


Kimitaka Matsuzato, Slavic Research Center, Hokkaido University

China, India, Korea, Mongolia, Turkey, and other countries outside the Euro-Atlantic world have deep research traditions studying and writing about the politics, economy, social life and culture of the countries in Central Europe and Eurasia. Unfortunately, eastern scholars of Europe and Eurasia rarely tap into these resources to gain new perspectives on developments in the region. In this presentation, Professor Matsuzato will describe some of the recent achievements and trends from these research communities and how they can be useful partners for Westerners studying Europe and Eurasia. He will also give a short overview of the upcoming International Council for Central and East European Studies (ICCEES) World Congress, which will be held in Makuhari, Japan, on August 3-8, 2015. These meetings take place once every five years. Unfortunately, participation in world congresses from North America has fallen during the last decade and the organizers hope to reverse this trend. The ICCEES World Congresses provide an excellent opportunity to learn more about research on the Slavic world now underway in non-European countries.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Matsuzato

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Affairs (IERES)

Tuesday, April 16, 2013
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

The Eastern Mediterranean and the Making of Global Radicalism, 1860-1914


Ilham Khuri-Makdisi, Associate Professor of Middle East and World History, Northeastern University

<i>The Eastern Mediterranean and the Making of Global Radicalism</i> establishes the existence of a special radical trajectory spanning four continents and linking Beirut, Cairo, and Alexandria between 1860 and 1914. It shows that radical ideas (more often than not a selective adaptation of socialist and anarchist ideas) were regularly discussed, disseminated, and reworked among intellectuals, workers, dramatists,Egyptians, Ottoman Syrians, ethnic Italians, Greeks, and others in these cities. It argues that migrant networks were central to the making of a globalized world, partly through the dissemination of ideas and practices that challenged the global world order and the logic of global capitalism.

The book challenges nationalist and elite narratives of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern history as well as Eurocentric ideas about global radical movements. It seeks to ""deprovincialize"" the history of the Eastern Mediterranean by emphasizing its social, cultural and intellectual links with other parts of the world.

Ilham Khuri-Makdisi received her Ph.D. in History/Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard University in 2004.  She is currently Associate Professor of Middle East and World History at Northeastern University.  Her <i>Eastern Mediterranean and the Making of Global Radicalism, 1860-1914</i> was published by University of California Press in 2010, and she has authored a number of articles and book chapters on the history of the Left in the Arab Mediterranean region, global migrations, and theater in the late nineteenth century."

Copies of Dr. Khuri-Makdisi's book, Eastern Mediterranean and the Making of Global Radicalism, 1860-1914, will be available for sale at this event.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/cm7txpo

Sponsored by the Institute for Middle East Studies (IMES)

Wednesday, April 17, 2013
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Heaven on Earth: A Journey Through Sharia Law


Sadakat Kadri, Legal Historian and Associate Tenant, Doughty Street Chamber

Some fourteen hundred years after the Prophet Muhammad first articulated God's law the shariaits earthly interpreters are still arguing about what it means. In <i>Heaven on Earth: A Journey Through Sharia Law</i>, legal historian and human rights attorney Sadakat Kadri argues that many people in the West harbor hazy or wrong ideas about Islamic law. Searching for the facts behind the myths, he traces the turbulent journey of Islam's foundation and expansion and shows how the Prophet's teachings evolved gradually into concepts of justice.

Sadakat Kadri is a legal historian and English barrister at the Doughty Street Chambers. In addition to his latest book, he regularly contributes to various publications including <i>The Guardian</i> and the <em>London Review of Books</em>, and is the author of <i>The Trial: A History from Socrates to O.J. Simpson</i> (2005).

A limited number of books will be available for GW students

The Middle East Policy Forum is presented with the generous support of ExxonMobil.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/mepf4-17

Sponsored by the Institute for Middle East Studies and the Middle East Policy Forum

Friday, April 19, 2013
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

The Global Financial Crisis: A Discussion of the International Systems Robustness and Resilience


Daniel Daianu, Former Minister of Finance, Romania

Moderated by:
Eliot Sorel, MD, Clinical Professor of Global Health; Founding Chair, World Youth Democracy Forum, IERES

Economic decline in many economies has caused enormous strain on their social life and politics  including stalled dialogue among key actors, slow decision-making on important issues, and augmented extremism in mature democracies, including chauvinism and xenophobia. The crisis of the welfare state, in conjunction with rising income inequality, has weakened societies already reeling from the financial crisis. The numerous conventional and unconventional shocks test the robustness and resilience of social, economic, and technological systems. The response to these threats strains the abilities of both liberal democracies and authoritarian states. Authoritarian systems, despite their capacity to mobilize large-scale resources relatively quickly, feel vulnerable to the free movement of information and, consequently, try to limit the use of modern media, such as the internet. But liberal democracies, too, may feel vulnerable when information is manipulated. The speaker will examine why societies robustness and resilience have been diminishing and offer a set of proposals to address the problem.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Daianu

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Affairs (IERES) and the World Youth Democracy Forum

Saturday, April 20, 2013
11:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Duques Hall, Room 152
2201 G St. NW

Shattered Resolve: A Simulation of Conflict and Cooperation on the Korean Peninsula


"Shattered Resolve" will look at US relations with the full variety of regional actors involved, such as North Korea, South Korea, Japan, Russia and China. Participants will grapple with serious questions of U.S. national interest, develop policies to pursue the decided upon objectives and attempt to determine optimal responses to a variety of crisis situations. Other participants may find themselves planning, and potentially executing, complex military operations and managing relations with a variety of different military and civilian colleagues. Participants will represent policy actors and practitioners from the U.S. government, including the Departments of Defense and State, the White House and the Intelligence Community, and key officers and staff members from U.S. Korea, U.S. Special Operations Command and U.S. Pacific Command.

Online registration is available using the RSVP link below. Registration does not close until the start of the simulation on April 20th, but we highly encourage early registration for optimal position placement. No previous experience is necessary, and we invite everyone who is interested to apply. Any questions, comments, or concerns can be sent to gwuscs@gmail.com.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/simulation

Sponsored by GW Strategic Crisis Simulations

Monday, April 22, 2013
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Book Event: Invisible Armies


Max Boot, Author, Invisible Armies; Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Senior Fellow for National Security Studies, Council on Foreign Relations

As fitting for the twenty-first century as von Clausewitz's <i>On War</i> was in its own time, <i>Invisible Armies</i> is the only complete account that assesses the impact of guerrilla uprisings throughout world history. Beginning with the first insurgencies in the ancient world  when Alexander the Great discovered that fleet nomads were harder to defeat than massive conventional armies  bestselling author Max Boot masterfully guides us from the Jewish rebellion against the Roman Empire up through the horrors of the French-Indochina War and the shadowy, post-9/11 battlefields of today. Relying on a diverse cast of unforgettable characters  not only Mao, Che, and Castro but also the legendary heartthrob Giuseppe Garibaldi, the eccentric Zionist, Orde Wingate, and the Quiet American, Edward Lansdale  Boot explodes everything we thought we knew about unconventional warfare. The result is a rollicking read that is also our most important work of non-traditional military history  and a new way to think about the threats of the future.<br/><br/>
Max Boot will discuss his latest book and take questions from the audience.

Lunch will be provided.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/invisiblearmies

Sponsored by the Institute for Security and Conflict Studies

Monday, April 22, 2013
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

City View Room, 7th Floor
1957 E Street NW

The 17th Annual Gaston Sigur Memorial Lecture with Professor Thomas Rawski


Thomas G. Rawski, Professor of Economics and History, the University of Pittsburgh

Join us for the 17th annual Gaston Sigur Memorial Lecture! This year, Professor Thomas G. Rawski will lecture on the topic of "China's Boom -- Why Not Earlier? Why So Long? Can it Last?"

5:00 PM - 5:30 PM Reception
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM Lecture

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/sigurmemorial

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Monday, April 22, 2013
6:00 PM - 7:15 PM

Harry Harding Auditorium, Room 213
1957 E Street, NW

What Lies Ahead: Russia's Political and Energy Outlooks For the Next Ten Years


Robert W. Orttung, Associate Research Professor of International Aairs; Assistant Director, Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Oleg Kozlovsky, Ph.D. Student, Higher School of Economics, Moscow; Fulbright Scholar

DPE Professional Foreign Service Fraternity and the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies are proud to host two Russia scholars, Dr. Orttung and Mr. Kozloksy, to discuss the key domestic political and energy challenges facing Russia over the next decade.

Please join us for a reception to be held outside the auditorium from 5:30pm-6pm.

RSVP: http://dperussia.eventbrite.com

Sponsored by DPE Professional Foreign Service Fraternity and the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Tuesday, April 23, 2013
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM

Suite 503
1957 E Street, NW

Mapping Trajectories of Indian Foreign Policy in the Age of Strategic Flux


Yogesh Joshi, Visiting Scholar, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, GW

As US is forced to make strategic adjustments in the Asia-Pacific, there is a growing debate in India over the future of its foreign policy. In the last decade India clearly tilted towards the US but as America re-balances in Asia, India seems to be reconsidering its strategic tilt. Nowhere is this more evident than in the domestic debate in India

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/joshi

Sponsored by the Rising Powers Initiative

Wednesday, April 24, 2013
4:30 PM - 7:00 PM

Room 505
1957 E Street NW

Risk and Resilience: Moving from Fear to Confidence


Ambassador Richard LeBaron, Senior Fellow, Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East, Atlantic Council

Ambassador LeBaron will provide some ideas and will solicit from the audience their own ideas on how science and technology can better inform the public debate about risks versus opportunities. A 1976 graduate of the Elliott School's Science, Technology and Public Policy program, he will also discuss his experience as a U.S. diplomat working in the Middle East and his current work on the Gulf at the Rafik Hariri Center at the Atlantic Council.<br /><br />
<em>This is a Science and Technology Policy Seminar Series Lecture</em>

RSVP: spi@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Center for International Science and Technology Policy and the University of Ottawa's Institute for Science, Society and Policy

Wednesday, April 24, 2013
6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

City View Room, 7th Floor
1957 E Street NW

Religious Orthodoxy and the Battle for Rationality - A Panel Discussion


Asad Q. Ahmed, Associate Professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies, University of California-Berkeley

Omar Sultan Haque, Instructor and Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Psychology, Harvard University

Keynote Speaker:
Pervez Amirali Hoodbhoy, Professor of Nuclear and High Energy Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University

Moderator:
Muhammad H. Faghfoory, Professor of Islamic Studies, GW

Please join IMES, AIC, and Project Nur, with support from the John Templeton Foundation, for the third event in a groundbreaking series exploring the intersections and divergences of faith and reason in "Science and Islam." Dialogues, held at college campuses across the country, address issues like creation, evolution, and extraterrestrial life. A panel of prominent Muslim scientists, along with students and other audience members, explore Muslim perspectives on science and discusses how Muslim-Americans grapple with some of today's scientific advancements.

Refreshments will be served.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/cc34ymy

Sponsored by the Institute for Middle East Studies (IMES) and the American Islamic Congress (AIC)'s Project Nur Initiative

Wednesday, April 24, 2013
6:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

The Conflicts in Mali: Roots and Roadmap


Anouar Boukhars, Nonresident Scholar, Carnegie Endowment's Middle East program; Assistant Professor of International Relations, McDaniel College, Westminster, Maryland

David Ottaway, Senior Scholar, Wilson Center's Middle East Program

Rudolph Atallah, Senior Fellow, Atlantic Council's Michael S. Ansari Africa Center; CEO, White Mountain Research, LLC

Sophia Moestrup, Deputy Director for Central and West Africa, National Democratic Institute for International Affairs

Moderator:
Paul Williams, Associate Professor of International Affairs; Director, Security Policy Studies Program, Elliott School of International Affairs

Panel discussion will be followed by a reception with light refreshments.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Sciencespo

Sponsored by the Elliott School International Programs and the Sciences Po Alumni Association

Thursday, April 25, 2013
12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Alumni House
1918 F Street NW

Book Event: The Politics of Nation-Building: Making Co-Nationals, Refugees and Minorities


Harris Mylonas, Author, The Politics of Nation-Building: Making Co-Nationals, Refugees and Minorities; Assistant Professor of Political Science, GWU

Georgi Derluguian, Fellow, The Wilson Center

What drives a state's choice to assimilate, accommodate, or exclude ethnic groups within its territory? In this groundbreaking work, Harris Mylonas argues that a state's nation-building policies toward non-core groupsany aggregation of individuals perceived as unassimilated ethnic groups by the ruling elite of a stateare inuenced by both its foreign policy goals and its relations with the external patrons of these groups. Mylonas makes three innovative conceptual moves: from the misused term 'minority' to 'non-core group'; from focusing on 'homelands' as the external actor to the more inclusive concept 'external power'; and, from the dichotomous - and narrow - conceptualization of policies 'inclusion/exclusion' or 'violent/non-violent' to 'assimilation, accommodation, and exclusion'. <i>The Politics of Nation-Building</i> injects international politics into the study of nation-building, building a bridge between international relations, and the comparative politics of ethnicity and nationalism.

Lunch will be provided and a book signing will follow. Limited copies of the book will be available for purchase. This event is on the record.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Mylonas

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Affairs (IERES) and the Program on New Approaches to Research and Security in Eurasia (PONARS Eurasia)

Thursday, April 25, 2013
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Suite 512 Conference Room
1957 E Street NW

Engaging Students Toward Youth Prosperity and Security: A UN Perspective


Ahmad Alhendawi, UN Secretary General's Envoy on Youth

Nicole Goldin, Director, Youth, Prosperity, and Security Initiative, Center for Strategic and International Studies; Adjunct faculty, Elliott School of International Affairs, GW

The panelists will discuss the importance of youth engagement in development and foreign policy, and the emerging agenda of youth at the United Nations.

RSVP: ids@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the United Nations, Center for Strategic and International Studies, the International Youth Foundation, and GW's International Development Studies program

Thursday, April 25, 2013
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

International Labor Migration and Migration Policy in the Context of EU Expansion


Iryna Yeleyko, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Ukraine

Today, international labor migration has acquired a global character. In practice all states are countries of origin, transit or destination for migrants and many countries play all three roles. Western Europe is one of the main destination regions and is itself strongly interested in receiving labor migrants. Developments on the European labor market are closely connected with EU expansion policies. Each expansion of the body has brought changes to the migrant flows. This talk will examine the EUs migration policies as they have evolved over time, their consequences for migration flows, and how these policies affect workers in Ukraine.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Yeleyko

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Affairs (IERES)

Thursday, April 25, 2013
6:00 PM - 7:15 PM

Room B12
1957 E Street NW

Book Event: Environmental Security


Elizabeth Chalecki, Author, Environmental Security; visiting Mellon Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, Goucher College

Marcus King, Director of Research, The Elliott School of International Affairs, GW

National security is widely recognized as central to military purview. However, it is also closely tied to severe weather events, disease outbreak, climate change, and resource depletion, all of which impact national security considerations. <i>Environmental Security</i> discusses the contemporary military, strategic, and security issues that arise as a result of global environmental problems. Elizabeth Chalecki presents a compelling case for how ecological health is linked to international security and why increased global attention to environmental security concerns necessitates understanding this connection. Chalecki analyzes how shortages and abundance of natural resources can contribute to conflict and insecurity and how nations must cooperate to manage these threats.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/environmentalsecurity

Sponsored by the Climate and Water Security Initiative

Thursday, April 25, 2013
6:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Latin American and Hemispheric Studies (LAHS) Capstone Presentations


Every year, LAHSP students conduct pro-bono field research in Latin America and the Caribbean for sponsor institutions. The opportunity allows them to integrate theory and practice to gain valuable insight into key issues facing the region.  As the culmination of their studies, their projects enable them to hone important skills for our students careers and bring significant added value to our program.

This event is free and open to the public. Light fare will be served.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/capstone2013

Sponsored by the Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Program (LAHSP)

Friday, April 26, 2013
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

Putting Your Money Where Your Mouth Is: Political Consumerism as Political Participation


Dietlind Stolle, Associate Professor of Political Science, McGill University

Dietlind Stolle's research focuses on various forms of political behavior in Europe, Canada, and the United States, including political and social attitudes, civic engagement, youth participation, political consumerism, and internet activism.  Dr. Stolle is the author of numerous articles and books, including <i>Political Consumerism and Global Responsibility-Taking</i> (forthcoming Cambridge University Press), co-authored with Michele Micheletti.  Dr. Stolle received her Ph.D. from Princeton University in 2000, and an M.A. from Claremont McKenna in 1993.

Part of IERES' European Politics Series

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Stolle

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (IERES)

Friday, April 26, 2013
5:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

International Development Studies Capstone Presentations


Opening Remarks:
Sean Roberts, Director, International Development Studies program, GW

The Elliott School's International Development Studies (IDS) class of 2013 will present their capstone research.

The IDS program culminates in a capstone project, for which student groups, under the guidance of a professor, seek out a real-world consulting experience with a development organization. Students are responsible for finding their own client organizations, and they fulfill field-based assignments, which are based on the needs of the client while also capitalizing on the students' strengths and capabilities. The IDS program has been implementing its capstone projects for close to a decade, during which time students have successfully undertaken development projects for dozens of leading development organizations, including government agencies, international organizations, NGOs, and consulting firms.

5:00 PM - 7:30 PM - Presentations
7:30 PM - 9:00 PM - Reception

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/idscapstone2013

Sponsored by the International Development Studies (IDS) program

Monday, April 29, 2013
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Nuclear Policy Talks: Why the United States Should Err on the Side of Too Many (Not Too Few) Nuclear Weapons


Matt Kroenig, Assistant Professor of Government, Georgetown University

Enthusiasm for nuclear reductions is driven by three beliefs about arsenal size widely held by experts in Washington:  First, a secure, second-strike capability is sufficient for deterrence and nuclear warheads in excess of this requirement can be cut with little loss to our national security.  Second, proliferation to rogue states and terrorist networks is a greater threat than nuclear war with great powers, and reductions can advance our nonproliferation objectives in Iran and elsewhere.  Third, we have spent hundreds of billions of dollars on nuclear weapons since 1945 and, in a time of budget austerity, reductions will result in cost savings. There is just one problem: all three beliefs are incorrect. A more pragmatic assessment suggests that the United States should not engage in additional nuclear reductions and should instead make the necessary investments to maintain a robust nuclear infrastructure for decades to come.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/kroenig

Sponsored by the Nuclear Policy Talks

Monday, April 29, 2013
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Global Policy Forum: Conservation, Civil Society and Tibet: A View from Beijing


Liu Jianqiang, Beijing Editor, Chinadialogue.net

Public talk by a leading Chinese environmental journalist.  Liu Jianqiang is the author of the acclaimed <i>Tianzhu</i> or <i>Heavenly Beads:  A Tibetan Legend</i> (2009).  He is also Beijing Editor of Chinadialogue.net, an online, bilingual forum on environmental issues in China. Formerly a senior investigative reporter with <i>Southern Weekend</i>, China's most influential investigative newspaper, he is known for his exposés of the controversial Tiger Leaping Gorge dams in southern Yunnan, genetically modified rice, and the Summer Palace Lake Reconstruction Project, all of which led to shifts in government policy. He has been featured in the <i>Wall Street Journal</i>'s study of investigative journalism in China, as well as in <i>China Ink: The Changing Face of Chinese Journalism</i>, and his books include <i>The Last Raft on the Jinsha River</i> (2012).

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/jianqiang

Sponsored by the Tibet Governance Project, Institute for Global and International Studies, and the Global Policy Forum

Monday, April 29, 2013
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Phillips Hall, Room 411
801 22nd St NW

Seminar: China's Foreign Policy and China-US Relations


David Shambaugh, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, GW

Jingxing Zhou, Political Counselor, Political Office, Chinese Embassy

Join Professor David Shambaugh and Political Counselor Jingxing Zhou from the Chinese Embassy for a discussion on Chinese foreign policy and U.S.China relations. Questions will be taken from the audience following their remarks.

RSVP: http://chinausrelations.eventbrite.com/

Sponsored by The Confucius Institute at the George Washington University, the Education Office at the Chinese Embassy in the U.S., the Sigur Center for Asian Studies, and Delta Phi Epsilon Professional Foreign Service Fraternity

Monday, April 29, 2013
4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Room 505
1957 E Street NW

Using Maps in a Region of Conflicts: The Caucasus


Jean Radvanyi, National Institute for Oriental Languages and Cultures

Maps are one of the main tools used by governments and other nation-engineers who try to construct new national identities. In the Caucasus, where the process of nation-building has been active since the late 1980s, maps help the key players to mobilize public opinion. They are featured in all kinds of media  newspapers, TV shows, schools, textbooks, political pamphlets, and advertising. Since the Caucasus as a whole is one of the hot-spot of Eurasia, maps are involved in a kind of competition: the battle of maps. This seminar will present this battle of maps and discuss its wider implications for shaping nation-building and political decision-making in the North and South Caucasus.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Radvanyi

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Affairs (IERES)

Monday, April 29, 2013
6:45 PM - 7:30 PM

State Room, 7th Floor
1957 E Street, NW

An Evening with U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood


Ray LaHood, Secretary of Transportation, U.S. Department of Transportation

GW's International Affairs Society is proud to announce that we will be hosting Secretary of Transportation Ray Lahood, a member of President Obama's Cabinet, for a discussion on international cooperation and transportation. Specifically, the Secretary will be discussing international cooperation and lessons learned from international partnerships during his tenure.

RSVP: http://iasraylahood.eventbrite.com/

Sponsored by GW's International Affairs Society

Tuesday, April 30, 2013
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Linguistic Piety in Islamic Java


Joel Kuipers, Professor of Anthropology, International Affairs, and Human Sciences, GW

The worldwide resurgence of Islamic piety has raised important methodological and theoretical questions about subjectivity: what do these expressions of devotion mean to the people who engage in them? Joel Kuipers calls for an ethnographic approach to piety, urging scholars to avoid prematurely attributing inner states and interior conditions to the people they describe

RSVP: go.gwu.edu/kuipers

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Tuesday, April 30, 2013
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Room 505
1957 E Street, NW

Human Trafficking in Russia


Lauren McCarthy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Human trafficking is considered one of the worst and most widespread violations of human rights today, with the International Labor Organization estimating that as of 2012, 18.7 million people worldwide are being exploited in the private economy.  This talk focuses on the trafficking phenomenon in Russia, discussing both sex and labor trafficking as well as what the criminal justice system has done to combat the problem.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/McCarthy

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Affairs (IERES)

Tuesday, April 30, 2013
5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Book Event: Democracy's Fourth Wave: Digital Media and the Arab Spring


Philip Howard, Associate Professor, Department of Communication, University of Washington

Muzammil M. Hussain, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Communication, University of Washington

Howard and Hussain will discuss their new book <i>Democracy's Fourth Wave: Digital Media and the Arab Spring</i>.

Book signing and wine reception will follow.
Limited copies of the book will be available for GW students.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/buocne9

Sponsored by the Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS)