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Events Calendar Archive

March 2012

Thursday, March 1, 2012
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

Ukraine's Prospects: Economic Development, Energy Policy, and Business Climate


Nazar Kholod, Lviv National University

Oleksandr Sukhodolia, Visiting Scholar, Institute for Russian, European, and Eurasian Studies,GW

Andriy Tsintsiruk, Assistant Director, U.S.-Ukraine Business Council

Two years ago, Ukraine's government announced an ambitious program of economic reforms. To date, however, these reforms have had a limited effect. Dissatisfaction with the lack of reform, especially reforms related to pension and welfare programs, has led to social tension. Energy concerns, including unresolved problems with Russia, continue to have a negative impact on the Ukrainian economy. The business climate also remains a challenge for domestic and international investors. The speakers will address these issues and analyze the recent economic developments in Ukraine.
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Nazar Kholod is a political economist whose work focuses on the economic and social development of post-Soviet countries. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Lviv University and is the author of <i>Income Distribution and Poverty in Transition Countries</i>.
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Oleksandr Sukhodolia is a visiting scholar at IERES focusing on energy security. He received his Ph.D. in Public Administration and has public service experience at various governmental agencies. He is the author of <i>Energy Efficiency Economics in the context of National Security: Research Methodology and Implementation Mechanisms</i>.
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Andriy Tsintsiruk is the assistant director of government relations and communications for the U.S.-Ukraine Business Council (USUBC). In this role, Tsintsiruk is responsible for developing, promoting, and executing USUBC programs and policy relating to U.S. trade and investment in Ukraine.

This event is part of IERES' Petrach Program on Ukraine.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/ukraineprospects

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Monday, March 5, 2012
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Elections and Public Opinion Polling in Russia


Vadim Volos, Vice President, GfK Roper Public Affairs and Corporate Communications

Russians will go to the polls on March 4 to elect a new president. The day after the elections, Institute of European, Russian and Eurasian Studies will host Vadim Volos, a polling expert who will explain how Russian public opinion polls are carried out, by whom, and how reliable they are. Mr. Volos will also discuss their political uses and the agendas that often drive the polls, as well as other issues and challenges. This talk will get under the hood of Russian polling by looking at sampling, under-coverage, if people are telling the truth to pollsters, the most common sources of errors, quality issues, the demographics of interviewers, and a variety of other issues. Both Russian and Western media are full of numbers about the campaign horse race, but often they do not discuss these methodological issues. In Q & A, the speaker will be prepared to talk about the results of the March 4 vote, the various forecasts and how the results looks versus the poll projections, and if there is any reason to suspect massive fraud.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/VolosGWU

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Professionals in European, Eurasian and Russian Studies (PEERS)

Monday, March 5, 2012
6:00 PM - 7:15 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Middle East Policy Forum: King's Counsel: A Memoir of War, Espionage, and Diplomacy in the Middle East


Vernon Loeb, Co-Author, King's Counsel: A Memoir of War, Espionage, and Diplomacy in the Middle East; Editor, The Washington Post

Vernon Loeb and Sean O'Connell will comment on the intriguing memoirs of Jack O'Connell (1921-2010), who served as CIA station chief in Amman, Jordan from 1963 to 1971 and was King Hussein's most trusted American adviser. Jack O'Connell then became the king's attorney and diplomatic counselor in Washington for three decades.  
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In his new book, Jack O'Connell tells the unknown story of his close interactions with Jordan's King Hussein.  Unraveling a coup aimed at the young King Hussein in 1958 and, later in 1967, alerting Hussein of Israel's imminent invasion of Egypt, Mr. O'Connell forged a deep and enduring friendship with the Jordanian King.  Mr. O'Connell's narrative contains surprising secrets that will revise our understanding of the Middle East.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/mepf3-05

Sponsored by the Middle East Policy Forum, which is presented with the generous support of ExxonMobil

Monday, March 5, 2012
8:00 PM - 9:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Sudan: Where are We Now?


Join GW STAND and the International Affairs Society as we get an update on the current on the ground situation in Sudan and South Sudan. Panelists including experts and Sudanese Diaspora will offer their insight into the current state of the new nation South Sudan and also the regions of Blue Nile and Nuba Mountains that are currently facing conflict.

RSVP: https://www.facebook.com/events/242881089135373/

Sponsored by GW STAND, The International Affairs Society

Tuesday, March 6, 2012
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Fifth Annual James Millar Lecture: Soviet Industrialization through the Lens of Neoclassical Growth Theory


Sergey Guriev, Professor of Economics and the Rector of the New Economic School, Moscow, Russia; President of the Center for Economic and Financial Research at the New Economic School

What was the economic cost of Stalin's policies? In order to construct a counterfactual for Stalin's industrialization, we have developed a general equilibrium, two-sector, neoclassical, non-balanced growth model with international trade, financial frictions and rural-urban migration frictions. We have calibrated the model using data for 1885-1940. Our main conclusion is that in an open market economy, industrialization would have occurred faster than under collectivization and price scissor policies. However, we also find that the planning economy has successfully overcome the market failure of the underdeveloped capital markets in Czarist Russia. This lecture is based on research conducted jointly with Anton Cheremukhin (Dallas Fed), Mikhail Golosov (Princeton), and Aleh Tsyvinski (Yale).

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/GurievMillar

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies and the Fifth Annual James Millar Lecture

Wednesday, March 7, 2012
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Visualizing Nuclear Energy


Michael Svoboda, Assistant Professor of Writing, GW; Contributor, Yale Forum on Climate Change and the Media

Laura Hermann, Senior Vice President, Potomac Communications Group

Changing the public's perception of nuclear energy will likely entail a change in the public image of nuclear energy. This panel features two presentations on the visual component of that work. In the first presentation on visual diction, Laura Hermann will update the graphic design principles of Edward W. Tufte for the new web world of social media and show how visual rhetoric can be used more effectively to explain nuclear energy to the American public. In the second presentation, on visual identifications, Michael Svoboda will examine how nuclear energy companies and their trade associations have tried to sell nuclear energy to the American public through advertisements aimed at different demographics under dramatically different circumstances. In the discussion that follows the audiences is invited to evaluate the industry's success in visualizing nuclear energy for the 21st century.

RSVP: http://bit.ly/A61EFC

Sponsored by the Nuclear Policy Talks and the Institute for Nuclear Studies

Wednesday, March 7, 2012
5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

When Victory is Not an Option: Islamist Movements in Arab Politics


Nathan J. Brown, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, GW

Nathan J. Brown is a distinguished scholar and author who specializes in Islamist movements, Palestinian politics, and Arab law and constitutionalism. He will be talking about his new book, <i>When Victory Is Not an Option: Islamist Movements in Arab Politics.</i>

A wine reception will follow. A limited number of books will be available to GW students

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/2r

Sponsored by Institute for Middle East Studies

Wednesday, March 7, 2012
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

New Date TBA.

POSTPONED: Steps Toward Recovery: Ireland's Economic and Foreign Policy Priorities


Michael Collins, Ambassador of Ireland to the United States

As Ireland's Government completes its first year in office, Ambassador Michael Collins will make a brief presentation on the progress that Ireland has made to date towards completing its economic recovery, on current Irish foreign policy priorities and on Ireland-U.S. relations. Ambassador Collins will be prepared to address questions from the audience.

Sponsored by Ambassadors Forum and the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Thursday, March 8, 2012
9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Jack Morton Auditorium
805 21st St NW

Women, Innovation and Aerospace


Charlie Bolden, Administrator, NASA

Lori Garver, Deputy Administrator, NASA

Veronica Villalobos, Director, Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Office of Personnel Management

Catherine Didion, National Academy of Engineering

Marcia Smith, SpacePolicyOnline.com and Space and Technology Policy Group LLC

Kathryn Sullivan, Deputy Directory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Marcia McNutt, Director, United States Geological Survey

Mamta Nagaraja, NASA

Kamla Modi, Girls Scouts

To celebrate Women's History Month, this day-long event will help to foster a discussion for students and early career professionals about how to continue to encourage women to enter and succeed in the field of aerospace.

RSVP: http://women.nasa.gov/womens-history-month/

Sponsored by the Space Policy Institute and NASA

Thursday, March 8, 2012
11:00 AM - 8:00 PM

City View Room, 7th Floor
1957 E Street NW

International Women's Day 2012 at the Elliott School


In honor of International Women's Day, the Global Gender Program at the Elliott School of International Affairs will present an exciting set of discussions on gender equality and UN peacekeeping, women and war, women's empowerment in the Middle East, and women in labor. Please join us to celebrate this important day and engage with experts on critical issues facing women and girls around the globe.

<i>11:00-11:30am - Brunch Meet & Greet</i>
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<i>11:30am-1:00pm - U.N. Peace Operations and Security Equality</i>
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Opening remarks:
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<b>Barbara Miller</b>, Director, Global Gender Program
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<b>Louise Olsson</b>, UNSCR 1325 Project Leader, Folke Bernadotte Academy
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<i>1:00-2:30pm - Women, War and Peace: Addressing Sexual Violence</i>
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<b>Jelke Boesten</b>, Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow, United States Institute of Peace
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<b>Dara Kay Cohen</b>, Assistant Professor, Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota
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<b>Kathleen Kuehnast</b>, Director, Gender and Peacebuilding Center, United States Institute of Peace
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Moderators:
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<b>Chantal de Jonge Oudraat</b>, Executive Director, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) North America
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<b>Kerry Frances Crawford</b>, Graduate Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Political Science, GW
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<i>2:30-3:00pm - Coffee break</i>
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<i>3:00-4:30pm - Improving Gender Equality: Informing Better Policy through Research in the Middle East, North Africa, and Beyond</i>
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<b>Rola Abdul-Latif</b>, Senior Research Specialist, Applied Research Center, International Foundation for Electoral Systems
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<b>Jane Henrici</b>, Study Director, Institute for Women's Policy Research; Professorial Lecturer in International Affairs, GW
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<b>Patti Petesch</b>, Consultant, World Bank
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<i>4:30-5:00pm - Coffee break</i>
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<i>5:00-6:00pm - Distinguished Women in International Affairs: Gender and Civilian Security</i>
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<b>Maria Otero</b>, Under Secretary, Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights, U.S. Department of State
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<i>6:00-8:00pm: Reception & Machik Fundraiser</i>

RSVP: http://bit.ly/w5jmfE

Sponsored by the Global Gender Program and the Institute for Global and International Studies

Thursday, March 8, 2012
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Hall of Government Room 102
710 21st Street NW

British Military Adaptation and the Struggle for Helmand, 2006-­11


Theo Farrell, Professor of War in the Modern World, King's College London, Vice Chair, British International Studies Association

Professor Farrell will give a presentation on British military adaptation in Helmand, Southern Afghanistan, 2006-11.
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Professor Farrell has undertaken assessments of operations in Helmand for the British Stabilization Unit (Oct.-Nov. 2009) and the British Army (April-May 2010). He was invited by the ISAF Commander, Gen. Stanley McChrystal, to join a strategic review of the campaign in January 2010, and in October 2010 undertook a theater-wide assessment for the Commander of ISAF Joint Command, Lt. Gen. David Rodriguez. Professor Farrell has been commissioned by the British Army to write the classified history of the Helmand campaign.

RSVP: security@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Security Policy Studies Program

Thursday, March 8, 2012
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Global Civil Society, Development Activism and the Third World Challenge to International Order


Victor Nemchenok, Mellon Pre-Doctoral Fellow, Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

The 1970s witnessed the emergence of a robust transnational network of non-state actors who came together to challenge the international economic order.  Its members included prominent economists and social scientists from across the developing world, international civil servants in UN and Bretton Woods institutions, and development advocates at non-profit organizations, all of whom perceived an opportune moment in the upheavals of the 1970s to mount an attack on the disparities and imbalances of the global economy.  The intellectual agenda forged by these individuals became the dominant current in development thinking well into the 1980s &mdash; one that continued to influence international development efforts well after the "neoliberal turn".  This presentation will discuss the origins of this global civil society, the way it reoriented international debates about socioeconomic development, and its efforts to influence national and international decision-makers.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/Nemchenok

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Thursday, March 8, 2012
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Russian Policy Toward Central Asia: Tools for Integration and Arguments for Security Involvement


Alexey Malashenko, Scholar-in-Residence, Carnegie Center, Moscow; Professor, Moscow State Institute of International Relations

Russia is trying to preserve its influence in Central Asia, and for a few years has actively promoted integrative strategies in the framework of the Customs Union, and the Eurasian Union project.  So far these structures are dominated mostly by the bilateral Russia-Kazakhstan relationship, while the other potential partners, above all Uzbekistan, have had a skeptical position toward Russias initiatives. Older projects such as the Eurasian Economic Union and the Collective Security Treaty Organization are viewed in the region as instruments of Russias influence. Central Asian governments are weary of these initiatives as they are trying not to be pressured by Moscow.  Accordingly, Moscow does not have a lot of tools at its disposal to influence the domestic and foreign strategies of the Central Asian states. However, the Russian elites are increasingly concerned about Central Asia as a zone of potential conflict and about the possible spread of militant Islamic groups, using labor migrants as a way of penetrating Russias territory.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/33

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Friday, March 9, 2012
9:15 AM - 1:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Remembering 3/11 Through the Eyes of Students from Japan


Michael Green, Senior Adviser and Japan Chair, Center for Strategic and International Studies; Professor, Georgetown University

Edward Lincoln, Professor, GW

Mike Mochizuki, Associate Dean for Academic Programs, Elliott School; Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, GW

It has been almost a year since the 9.0M earthquake hit the northeastern part of Japan, but the damage from the tsunami and the nuclear fallout continues to affect thousands of lives.  In remembrance of this tragic disaster, the Japanese American Student Union of D.C. has invited 25 students from Japan, including those from the most devastated Tohoku region, to share their personal experiences and to consider how our generation can contribute to Japan's recovery.  JASU is also honored to invite Professors Michael Green, Edward Lincoln, and Mike Mochizuki to discuss Japan's future economic, domestic and foreign policy challenges.

9:15-9:30 AM Registration; 9:30-12:30 PM Event; 12:30-1:00 PM Lunch

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/JapanMarch9

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies, Japanese American Student Union, and Organization of Asian Studies

Friday, March 9, 2012
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

The Political and Social Antecedents of the Greek Economic Crisis


Thanos Veremis, Professor Emeritus of Political History, University of Athens

The present multifaceted crisis in Greece is the outcome of the populist policies and rhetoric of the 1980s. A "segmentary" society of longstanding populism legitimized the legal transgressions of Greek political parties. We are now paying the price of our own transgressions.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/VeremisGWU

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Thursday, March 15, 2012
4:00 PM - 5:00 AM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Uses of History and Regional Diversity in Ukraine's Elections: The Contested Past as an Electoral Resource, 2004-12


Alexandr Osipian, Associate Professor of History and Cultural Anthropology, Kramatorsk Institute of Economics and Humanities

Why do Ukraine's electoral preference maps reflect persistent regional division in the 2004, 2006, 2007, and 2010 elections? How do politicians manipulate and divide society in Ukraine? Why are history and memory issues so important in Ukrainian political debates and the mass-media? What strategies will be used in the 2012 and 2015 election campaigns? Alexandr Osipian will address these questions in his presentation.
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Alexandr Osipian is currently a visiting scholar at IERES. He is an associate professor of history and cultural anthropology at the department of history and cultural studies at Kramatorsk Institute of Economics and Humanities, Ukraine. He has conducted research at the Central European University (Hungary), European University Institute (Italy), Warsaw University, Jagiellonian University (Poland), Deutsches Historisches Institut Warschau, and Universität Leipzig (Germany). His research interests include the politics of memory and national identity construction in Ukraine since 1991. Mr. Osipian's current work is on the uses of history and memory in Ukrainian politics during electoral campaigns and in international relations with Russia, Poland, and the European Union.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/OsipianGWU

Sponsored by Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Friday, March 16, 2012
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

City View Room, 7th Floor
1957 E Street NW

Panel Discussion: Aftermath of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident


William D. Magwood, IV, Commissioner, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Andre-Claude Lacoste, Chairman, Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN, France)

Masashi Hirano, Associate Vice-President, Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES, Japan)

Edward Kee, Vice-President, NERA Economics Consulting"

This panel discussion will address the policies the nuclear safety agencies have adapted after the accident to keep the public safe and the affect of the accident on future construction of nuclear reactors. The panel discussion is composed of international regulators, who will present the initiatives taken by their agencies in the wake of the accident.

RSVP: http://bit.ly/ztvq0j

Sponsored by The Nuclear Policy Talks, the Institute for Nuclear Studies, and The School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Friday, March 16, 2012
3:00 PM - 5:45 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Russia's Energy Policy: Domestic and Foreign Dimensions


Energy is a key driver for Russia's domestic and foreign policy. Regardless of the political situation in the country, Russia will continue to rely on this sector as its main source of revenue. This panel discussion will provide an overview of the current state of the international oil and gas markets and Russia's place within them. It will also examine how energy affects the Russian environment and its relations with its nearest neighbors in the west, south, and east.

<i>3:00 to 4:00 Panel 1: Domestic Issues</i>
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<b>Scott Shemwell</b>, Managing Director, The Rapid Response Institute, "Challenges for the International Oil and Gas Markets: A Business Perspective"
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<b>Xu Liu</b>, Institute of European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies Visiting Scholar, GW; Slavic Research Center, Hokkaido University, "The Environmental Factor in Russian Energy Policy"
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<i>4:00 to 4:15 Coffee Break</i>
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<i>4:15 to 5:45 Panel 2: Foreign Policy</i>
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<b>Keun-Wook Paik</b>, Senior Research Fellow, Oxford Institute for Energy Studies, "East Asia Energy Cooperation"
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<b>Dicle Korkmaz</b>, Institute of European, Russian, and Eurasian Visiting Scholar, GW; University of Tampere, "Russian-Turkish Energy Relations"
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<b>Oleksandr Sukhodolia</b>, Institute of European, Russian, and Eurasian Visiting Scholar, GW; Fulbright Scholar, "Russian-Ukrainian Energy Relations"
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Discussion Chair: <b>Robert Orttung</b>, Institute of European, Russian, and Eurasian Assistant Director, GW

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/PanelGWU

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Slavic Research Center, Hokkaido University, and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science

Monday, March 19, 2012
12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Myanmar in Transition: New Dynamics between ASEAN and Yangon


Amitav Acharya, Professor of International Relations, American University

David Steinberg, Distinguished Professor, Georgetown University

Discussant
Christina Fink, Professor of Practice of International Affairs, GW

Moderator
Deepa Ollapally, Associate Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Although the situation remains highly uncertain, the pace with which Myanmar has rolled out reforms in the last few months has taken many long-time Myanmar watchers and policymakers in Southeast Asia, Washington, and elsewhere by surprise. This panel of three Myanmar and ASEAN experts will examine the new dynamics in the relationship between ASEAN and Burma, as well as suggest specific policies that influential external actors like ASEAN and the United States, may use to engage the regime in Yangon.

12:00-12:30 PM Lunch; 12:30-2:00 PM Presentation and Discussion

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/MyanmarMarch19

Sponsored by The Sigur Center for Asian Studies, The Rising Powers Initiative

Tuesday, March 20, 2012
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Facilitating Nuclear Disarmament: Verified Declarations of Fissile Material Stocks and Production


Alexander Glaser, Assistant Professor, The Woodrow Wilson School of International Affairs and the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University

National declarations of fissile material holdings-highly enriched uranium and plutonium-could play an important role in supporting growing interest in nuclear disarmament, by facilitating not only transparency but also the irreversibility of the process. This briefing discusses what kind of content such declarations could have in order to be meaningful and effective, the sequence of data on fissile material holdings that states might release, and some of the challenges to be expected in reconstructing historic fissile material production. This discussion also summarizes current attitudes of nuclear weapon states toward making such declarations, discusses the capabilities and limitations of potential approaches to verifying declarations of historic production of plutonium and highly enriched uranium, and identifies opportunities for further research and development.

RSVP: NonproliferationReview@gmail.com

Sponsored by the Nuclear Policy Talks, the Institute for Security and Conflict Studies, and the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies

Tuesday, March 20, 2012
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

The Chung-wen Shih Conference Room, Suite 503
1957 E Street NW

Conversations with Scholars: "Red Vengeance: Political Inequality and Maoist Violence in India"


Emmanuel Teitelbaum, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs; Director, Master of Arts Program in Asian Studies, GW

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh has characterized the Maoist insurgency as 'India's number one internal security threat.' Yet despite its implications for the stability of the worlds largest democracy, and one of the United States' most important allies in Asia, the insurgency has not received serious attention by scholars. What are the causes of the Maoist uprising and how should the Indian government respond to it? Should India rely on its military in dealing with the rebels? Or should the conflict be addressed by ameliorating the poverty and inequality that are thought to fuel the violence? Finally, what is the role of political inequality in the conflict? Might greater political participation by traditionally excluded groups help to alleviate tensions between the government and the Maoists?

Open only to current GW students and staff

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/TeitelbaumMarch20

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies, the Organization for Asian Studies

Tuesday, March 20, 2012
1:00 PM - 2:30 AM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Gendering Gender: Rethinking Sexual Violence in war and Peace


Jelke Boesten, Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow, United States Institute of Peace; Senior Lecturer in Social Development and Human Security, University of Leeds

Jelke Boesten will present a talk in which she explores the persistence of sexual and gender-based violence in both war and peace, or what some scholars have called the continuum of violence. Following Judith Butler (2004, 54-55), who in turn follows the legal scholar Katherine Franke, Dr. Boesten argues that the view according to which sexual violence against women is solely a product of male domination over women reproduces the gender binary which the violence is assumed to express. Taking into account the ways in which sexual violence is productive of the foundational categories that inform hegemonic masculinities and femininities may give us tools to denaturalize these same categories, which inform the male perpetrator and the female victim. She propose a gender perspective upon violence against women, i.e., not a perspective that victimizes women and blames men, but one that looks at the dynamics of the reproduction of racialised hegemonic masculinities and femininities through violence. A perspective that takes into account the reproduction of racialised and heteronormative hierarchies also allows us to see violences obscured by the men dominate women focus, and how these hierarchies are entrenched in institutions through the naturalizing effect of the prevailing gender-binary.

Light refreshments will be provided.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/jelke

Sponsored by the Global Gender Forum and The Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Program

Tuesday, March 20, 2012
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Holocaust Angst: The Federal Republic of Germany and Holocaust Memory in the United States, 1977 - 1990


Jacob Eder, Mellon Pre-Doctoral Fellow, IERES

This talk will examine German cultural diplomacy in the United States and its relevance for the formation of transnational Holocaust memory. It will focus on this topic from three angles: the exponentially growing interest of American society in the Holocaust and its impact on German-American relations since the late 1970s; efforts in the United States on the part of the Federal Republic to (re-)claim the power of interpretation over the history of the Holocaust; and the reception of such policies in the United States by governmental and private institutions and individuals.
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Jacob S. Eder is a Ph.D. candidate in history at the University of Pennsylvania and an associate member of the graduate school of the Jena Center for the History of the 20th Century, Germany. During the 2011-12 academic year, he is a Mellon Pre-Doctoral Fellow IERES as part of the Program on Conducting Archival Research (POCAR). He holds M.A. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where he spent an academic year on a Fulbright Scholarship.

This event is part of IERES' Visiting Scholar Roundtable

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/EderGWU

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Tuesday, March 20, 2012
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Room 505
1957 E Street NW

China, India, and Water Security in the Greater Himalayas


Katherine Morton Associate Dean, College of Asia and the Pacific; Senior Fellow, Department of International Relations, Australian National University

The Himalayan Tibetan Plateau contains more than 15,000 glaciers that feed the major river systems in Asia that, in turn, support up to 20 per cent of the world's population. China and India are likely to play defining roles in shaping the region's water future. This lecture will present an overview of water security concerns in the region and the complex trade-offs between water, energy, and food demands during a period of rapid industrialization. It will examine both the limits and opportunities for enhancing transboundary governance, highlighting the central importance of greater cooperation across the Sino-Indian border.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/MortonMarch20

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Tuesday, March 20, 2012
5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Violence, Nonviolence, and the Palestinian National Movement: A Conversation with Wendy Pearlman


Wendy Pearlman, Crown Junior Chair in Middle East Studies and Assistant Professor of Political Science, Northwestern University

Ms. Pearlman will be discussing her new book, <i>Violence, Nonviolence, and the Palestinian National Movement</i>

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/2h

Sponsored by the Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS) and the Institute for Middle East Studies

Wednesday, March 21, 2012
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Innovations in Inclusiveness and Accountability: How the ADB Ensures Responsible Development Investment in Asia


Ann Quon, Principal Director, External Relations Department, Asian Development Bank

Geoffrey R. Crooks, Associate Secretary to the Compliance Panel, Office of Compliance Review Panel, Asian Development Bank

Karin Oswald, Lead Facilitation Specialist, Office of Special Project Facilitator, Asian Development Bank

James E. Foster, Professor of Economics and International Affairs, GW

Moderator: Linda J. Yarr, Director, PISA

In an era of public mistrust of many major financial institutions, learn how the Asian Development Bank is increasing accountability and transparency in its lending practices:
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The Public Communications Policy of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) is a living document that guides the institutions efforts to be transparent and accountable to the people it serves. The revised Accountability Mechanism provides an avenue for affected people to seek redress when policy violations in ADB operations cause them harm. These policies recognize that transparency and accountability are essential to development effectiveness. ADBs vision of Asia and the Pacific free of poverty cannot be achieved unless ADB is aware of its stakeholders needs and, conversely, they understand and support ADBs role and operations in the region.

Lunch will be provided.

RSVP: pisa@gwu.edu

Sponsored by The Sigur Center for Asian Studies, the Partnerships for International Strategies in Asia

Wednesday, March 21, 2012
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Harry Harding Lecture Hall, Room 213
1957 E Street NW

Palestine's Prospective Path: A Discussion with the Chief Representative of the PLO to the U.S.


Ambassador Maen Rashid Areikat, Chief Representative to the U.S., Palestinian Liberation Organization

Please join DPE Professional Foreign Service Fraternity, the Arab Student Association, and J Street U as we host the Chief Representative of the PLO to the U.S., Ambassador Maen Rashid Areikat.  He will speak on the current issues facing Palestine and it's path forward.  Following his remarks, there will be a Q&A session for audience members to dialogue further with the Chief Representative.

Reception to follow

RSVP: http://www.eventbrite.com/event/3030872421

Sponsored by Delta Phi Epsilon Professional Foreign Service Fraternity, the Arab Student Association, J Street U

Thursday, March 22, 2012
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Ukraine's Energy Security: Geopolitics, Economics, and Governance


Oleksandr Sukhodolia, Visiting Scholar, Institute of European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

The Ukrainian energy sector is accelerating the privatization of its assets. However, the positive effects of this development could be undermined by unreformed energy markets, unstable energy policies and nontransparent decision making. Improving the functioning of the sector requires addressing these problems.
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Making progress means gaining a clearer picture of the interests of the key players: Ukraines power elite, domestic energy companies, and the consumers. While the elite want to keep low prices to prevent social unrest and the consumers want to continue receiving subsidies, the companies need more money to pay for necessary investments. This talk will discuss how the economic and cultural background of the political elite and society, the governance models, and the institutional framework of energy relations affect Ukraine's energy policy. Additionally, it will examine the influence of global energy players in developing Ukraine's energy security model.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/sukhodolia

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Thursday, March 22, 2012
6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Harry Harding Lecture Hall, Room 213
1957 E Street NW

The 2012 Annual Kuwait Chair Lecture Gulf Monarchies: Facing Change


Ambassador Edward W. "Skip" Gnehm, Jr., Kuwait Professor of Gulf and Arabian Peninsula Affairs, GW

Popular protests toppled regimes in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya and launched persistent challenges to established regimes elsewhere in 2011. In contrast, the Gulf monarchies, except Bahrain, maintained relative stability and control. Although the Gulf monarchies appear immune to political upheaval, changing domestic conditions and growing political dissent present real challenges to ruling monarchs. This lecture will focus on the changing political environments in the Gulf monarchies, examining domestic issues as well as regional challenges confronting these regimes in light of the transformational Arab protests of 2011.

The Middle East Policy Forum is presented with the generous support of ExxonMobil.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/mepf3-22-2012

Sponsored by The Middle East Policy Forum

Friday, March 23, 2012
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Kazakhstan and Global Nuclear Politics


Togzhan Kassenova, Associate and Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow, The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Togzhan Kassenova will discuss the factors behind Kazakhstan's decision to give up nuclear weapons left on its territory after the collapse of the Soviet Union. She will also address Kazakhstan's current nuclear policy, specifically focusing on the country's nuclear fuel cycle and Kazakhstan's role in the global nuclear nonproliferation regime.

RSVP: http://bit.ly/AevbSX

Sponsored by the Nuclear Policy Talks and the Institute for Security and Conflict Studies

Monday, March 26, 2012
5:10 PM - 6:00 PM

Duques Hall 251
2201 G Street NW

US Government Decision Making Process: Strengths & Weaknesses


Roger George, Associate Professor of Security Studies, National War College

Dr. Roger George is Associate Professor of Security Studies at the National War College. After receiving a Ph.D in International Relations from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and teaching for several years, Mr. George served as an intelligence analyst at the CIA for 30 years, rising in the Senior Analytic Service. Mr. George's also served as a Policy Planning Staff member in the Department of State, the National Intelligence Officer for Europe, and the Director of the Policy and Analysis Group for the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs. Mr. George's extensive publications on intelligence and the American national security process include most recently <i>The National Security Enterprise: Navigating the Labyrinth</i> (Georgetown University Press, 2011)

RSVP: security@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Security Policy Studies Program

Wednesday, March 28, 2012
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

After the Earthquake and Tsunami: Japan's Nuclear, Economic, and Political Challenges -- One Year Later


Philippe Bardet, Assistant Professor of Engineering and Applied Science, GW

James Kilpatrick, Adjunct Professor of Economics and International Affairs, GW

Llewelyn Hughes, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, GW

Moderator: Edward Lincoln, Professorial Lecturer, GW

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/JapanMarch28

Sponsored by the Sigur Center of Asian Studies

Thursday, March 29, 2012
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

The Current Situation in Belarus: Historical Perspectives and Recent Developments


Stanislaw Shushkevich, Former President, Belarus

Belarus is frequently described as the last dictatorship in Europe thanks to the policies of its current leader, Alyaksandr Lukashenka. Belarus is also facing increasing pressure from the West and Russia and its future prospects are uncertain. Former President Stanislaw Shushkevich will discuss the historical trajectory of the country since the collapse of the USSR. He will also provide insights into the current challenges it faces from his unique perspective as the former leader.
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Today, Mr. Shushkevich is the chairman of the Central Rada of the Belarusian Social Democratic Party. His accomplishments include ridding Belarus of all strategic and tactical nuclear weapons.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/ShushkevichGWU

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Professionals in European, Eurasian and Russian Studies (PEERS)

Friday, March 30, 2012
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

The Freedom to Be Racist? How the United States and Europe Struggle to Preserve Freedom and Combat Racism


Eric Bleich, Professor of Political Science, Middlebury College

Erik Bleich is a Professor of Political Science at Middlebury College. He is the author of <i>The Freedom to Be Racist? How the United States and Europe Struggle to Preserve Freedom and Combat Racism</i> (Oxford 2011), and <i>Race Politics in Britain and France: Ideas and Policymaking since the 1960s</i> (Cambridge 2003). His articles have appeared in journals such as <i>World Politics</i>, <i>Comparative Political Studies</i>, <i>Comparative Politics</i>, <i>the European Political Science Review</i>, <i>the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies</i>, and <i>Theory & Society</i>. He has also edited and contributed to the book <i>Muslims and the State in the Post-9/11 West</i> (Routledge, 2010). At Middlebury, Professor Bleich has served as Director of European Studies and is currently Director of International Politics & Economics.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/BleichGWU

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies