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March 2011

Tuesday, March 1, 2011
12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

City View Room, 7th Floor
1957 E Street, NW

U.S. Influence and the Informal Rules of the IMF


Randall W. Stone, Professor of Political Science, University of Rochester

Alex Mourmouras, Chief, European Division, International Monetary Fund Institute

Mr. Stone's research focuses on international political economy that combines formal theory, quantitative methods, and qualitative fieldwork. He is the author of Lending Credibility (Princeton University Press, 2002) and Satellites and Commissars(Princeton University Press, 1996), as well as articles in the American Political Science Review, International Organization, International Studies Quarterly, The Journal of Conflict Resolution, Review of International Organizations, and Global Environmental Politics.

At the institute, Mr. Mourmouras is in charge of formulating and implementing training programs for officials from Central, Eastern, Southeastern Europe, the Baltics, Russia, Ukraine, the Caucasus, Central Asia and selected other transition countries. In 2007, he served as Acting Director and Chief Training Economist of the Joint Africa Institute (JAI) in Tunis, Tunisia. From 1999 to 2003 he was economist and senior economist in the IMF's Policy Development and Review Department (PDR).

Please join us for a discussion of <i>Controlling Institutions: International Organizations and the Global Economy</i> with presentation by Randall W. Stone and commentary by Alex Mourmouras. The book shows how a combination of formal and informal rules explains how international organizations really work. It shows that U.S. interests influence the size, terms, and enforcement of IMF programs. New data, archival documents, and interviews reveal the shortcomings of IMF programs in Mexico, Russia, Korea, Indonesia, and Argentina.

PONARS Eurasia is generously supported by the International Program of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

RSVP: novikova@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Eurasian, and Russian Studies (IERES), and the Program on New Approaches to Research and Security in Eurasia (PONARS Eurasia)

Tuesday, March 1, 2011
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Security Policy Forum: Egypt: After the Revolution


Michele Dunne, Co-chair, Bipartisan Working Group of Egypt; Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Lunch will be served.

Please RSVP at: http://tiny.cc/spfegypt

Sponsored by the Security Policy Forum, the Institute for Middle East Studies, and the Institute for Security and Conflict Studies

Tuesday, March 1, 2011
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Monroe Hall, Kendrick Conference Room, Room 321
2115 G Street, NW

Quantifying Vulnerability to Climate Change: Implications for Adaption Assistance


David Wheeler, Senior Fellow, Center for Global Development

Trade and Development Workshop Series

Please RSVP here: http://tinyurl.com/iieptradeworkshop

Sponsored by the Institute for International Economic Policy

Tuesday, March 1, 2011
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

The Chung-wen Shih Conference Room, Room 503
1957 E Street, NW

Conversations with Scholars: Thoughts on US-China Relations with Bruce Reynolds


Bruce Reynolds, Professor of Economics, University of Virginia; Visiting Scholar, Institute for International Economic Policy, GW

This event is an informal luncheon and Q&A session on US-China relations with Bruce Reynolds for OAS members and GW students.
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Mr. Reynolds is a professor of economics at the University of Virginia and a visiting scholar this year at the Elliott School of International Affairs' Institute for International Economic Policy. He first visited China in 1973, was a visiting scholar at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, and has visited China nearly every year since 1988. In the 1980s, Mr. Reynolds was one of the first American economists to study Chinese economic reform and published articles such as "Choosing a Strategy for China's Economic Reform" (<i>American Economic Review</i>, 1988). He edited the book <i>Chinese Economic Reform: How Far, How Fast?</i> (Academic Press, 1988) and his articles on the Chinese economy have been published in dozens of scholarly journals and books. His main research interests are inequality, development, and institutional change in transition economies. Mr. Reynolds received his B.A. from Yale University and his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

This event is only open to GW students.

Lunch will be provided.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/4jvd6vg

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies and the Organization for Asian Studies

Tuesday, March 1, 2011
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Room 505
1957 E Street, NW

Yanukovych's Ukraine: Results from the First Year


Erik Herron, Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Kansas

Randall Stone, Professor of Political Science, University of Rochester

Robert Orttung, Assistant Director, the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, GW

Andriy Pekhnyk, Visiting Scholar, the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, GW

Moderated by:
Henry Hale, Director, the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, GW

President Viktor Yanukovych came to power in Ukraine one year ago. His rule marked a dramatic shift away from the 2004 Orange Revolution. Under his leadership, Ukraine has greatly improved its relationship with Russia. However, it has suffered significant setbacks in terms of democratic institution building. Similarly, it remains dependent on the International Monetary Fund to boost and reform its ailing economy.

To provide an overview of the past year in Ukrainian politics and economics, IERES will present a panel of speakers marking Yanukovych's first year in office. Each speaker will make a short presentation to be followed by questions from the audience. Erik Herron will discuss the quality of the local elections held on October 31. Randall Stone will examine the evolving relationship between the IMF and Ukraine. Robert Orttung will give an overview of the democratic setbacks over the last year. Andriy Pekhnyk will give the view from Lviv. Henry Hale will chair the discussion.

Part of IERES Petrach Program on Ukraine.

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Tuesday, March 1, 2011
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Reforming U.S. Foreign Assistance: Dream or Reality?


Connie Veillette, Director, Rethinking U.S. Foreign Assistance Program, Center for Global Development

John Norris, Executive Director, Sustainable Security and Peacebuilding Initiative, Center for American Progress.

George Ingram, Co-Chair, Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network

Moderator:
Sean Roberts, Director, International Development Studies Program, GW

Please join the International Development Forum for a panel discussion on the current efforts to reform U.S. foreign aid and development assistance.

Light refreshments will be served.

This event is part of the International Development Forum.

Please RSVP at: http://aidreform.eventbrite.com/

Sponsored by the International Development Studies Program and the Organization for International Development (OID)

Wednesday, March 2, 2011
11:00 AM - 2:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

Bolivia: Competing Worldviews and Agendas


Simon Yampara, Delegate, International Affairs, Office of the Mayor, La Paz; Professor of History, University of El Alto

Nelson Jordan, Professor, Nur University

Simón Yampara is a well-know Aymara intellectual who has published various books and articles on Andean cosmovision and civilizatory roots, the most recent being an essay on "Links Between the Civilization of Tiwanaku and the Bolivian Constitution." Dr. Yampara is currently the Delegate for Intercultural Affairs in the mayor's office in La Paz and history professor at the University of El Alto.
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Nelson Jordán is a theologian and specialist in the history of eastern Bolivia. He is a professor at Nur University, a researcher with the Program of Strategic Studies in Bolivia (La Paz), and an author. He has authored and co-authored various books and articles about Santa Cruz and eastern Bolivia.

Light refreshments will be provided.

Please RSVP at: https://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?formkey=dEtsakNaY0JDRWRsYURRUmRUOXFISmc6MQ

Sponsored by Latin America Hemispheric Studies Program and the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA)

Wednesday, March 2, 2011
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Room 505
1957 E Street, NW

Fair and Rules-based: A New Trade Policy for Europe


Lucian Cernat, Chief Trade Economist, European Commission

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/iieppolicyforum

Sponsored by the Institute for International Economic Policy and International Economic Policy Forum

Wednesday, March 2, 2011
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

Selling a Western Way of Life? The Politics of Popular Culture in Cold War Yugoslavia


Sabina Mihelj, Visiting Scholar, Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, GW

Western popular culture is often credited with contributing to the collapse of communism. As the Cold War division of the world was crumbling apart, Western radio broadcasts, popular tunes, fashions and youth cultures were praised for nurturing the hope of a different way of life, one presumably associated with the West. Recent research on the nature of everyday life in late socialism, however, calls for a more careful assessment of the role of Western cultural imports. This presentation contributes to this debate by examining the politics of popular culture in Cold War Yugoslavia.
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Dr. Sabina Mihelj is Senior Lecturer in Communication and Media Studies at Loughborough University, UK. Her research interests include issues of collective identity and mass communication, comparative analysis of media systems, and the history of mass communication and popular culture in socialist Yugoslavia. She is the author of several works, including <i>Media Nations: Communicating Belonging and Exclusion in the Modern World</i> (Palgrave, forthcoming 2011).

This event is part of IERES' Visiting Scholar Roundtable Series

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Thursday, March 3, 2011
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

The Russian Presidential Election of March 2012: Its Impact on Current Politics


Peter Reddaway, Professor Emeritus of Political Science and International Affairs, GW

In 2005-2007, high politics in Russia was heavily influenced by largely covert struggles over who should become president and prime minister in 2008. Putin was subjected to powerful pressures. Sergei Ivanov was evidently dropped by the Putin circle as its presidential candidate only in September 2007. Medvedev was only chosen as his replacement at the last minute - in December. Also, it seems unlikely that Putin was happy to feel he had to become prime minister.
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In 2009-2011, similar struggles and uncertainty can be observed regarding the presidential election due in March 2012. Again, a powerful lobby is determined to ensure its political and business survival by persuading or compelling Putin to stay in one of the two top jobs. Again, Putin appears reluctant to stay, even though, as in 2005-2007, he has prepared the ground for doing so if it can't be avoided. As before, he's apparently trying to keep several options open. And as before, it seems likely that the ultimate decision will not emerge until late in the year.
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However, Putin's voice may have less weight than it did last time. Although he has successfully deflated Medvedev's hopes of being routinely endorsed for a second term, his own standing in the ruling elite has fallen quite substantially. A growing number of powerful figures and groups oppose quite strongly the idea that he should return to the presidency. They believe that he has led Russia into a political and economic dead-end. A spate of statements to this effect has appeared in the media and on the Internet, along with revelations of Putin's profound corruption. True, no alternative leader has yet emerged. But his opponents' tactics may be to have Medvedev stay on as president, backed by a strong and competent person as prime minister. Other combinations also seem possible. Much may depend on personalities, chance factors, and how factional struggles play out.

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Friday, March 4, 2011
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

Deadly Communities: Anti-Jewish Pogroms in the Shadow of the Holocaust


Jeffrey Kopstein Professor of Political Science; Director, Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, University of Toronto

Professor Kopstein's publications include various books and edited volumes, including Growing Apart? America and Europe in the 21st Century, Comparative Politics: Interests, Identities, and Institutions in a Changing Global Order, and The Politics of Economic Decline in East Germany.

Why, after the outbreak of World War II in Eastern Europe, did the inhabitants of some communities erupt in violence against their Jewish neighbors?  Mr. Kopstein will argue that the greater the degree of preexisting intercommunal polarization between Jews and the titular majority group, the more likely it was that a pogrom would occur. Where Jews supported ethnic parties that advocated minority cultural autonomy, the local populations perceived the Jews as an obstacle to the creation of a nation-state in which minorities acknowledged the right of the titular majority to impose its culture across a country's entire territory. These communities became toxic. Where determined state elites could politically integrate minorities, pogroms were far less likely to occur. The results of Mr. Kopstein's study point to the theoretical importance of political assimilation and are also consistent with research that extols the virtues of interethnic civic engagement.

Part of the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies' European Politics Series.

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studes

Friday, March 4, 2011
2:00 PM - 3:45 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

Environmental Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Challenges and Prospects


Elizabeth Wishnick, Associate Professor of Political Science and Law, Montclair State University

Laura A. Henry, Associate Professor of Government and Legal Studies, Bowdoin College

Yasunori Hanamatsu, Visiting Scholar, Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, GW

Moderator:
Henry E. Hale, Director, Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, GW

In Northeast Asia, environmental degradation and competition over scarce resources have the potential to contribute to political tension in a region that still has many remaining territorial disputes and where distrust among neighboring countries is still an issue. Recently, the region has seen new efforts to improve inter-regional cooperation between states, such as Russia, China and Japan. Joint monitoring, cooperative research, and harmonization of standards and processes can serve the dual function of  resolving common environmental problems and improving relations among states. On the other hand, it is pointed out that in most issue areas, the states of Northeast Asia have not yet developed a shared understanding of common environmental problems.
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Our panelists will discuss how we can evaluate the emerging environmental cooperation in the region, what is needed to promote further regional cooperation among states of the region on environmental issues.

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Sigur Center for Asian Studies, the Slavic Research Center, and Hokkaido University

Friday, March 4, 2011
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

CANCELED: Alter(ed)natives


Dr. Gina Athena Ulysse, Associate Professor of Anthropology, African Studies, Environmental Studies, and Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Wesleyan University; Inaugural Fellow, College of the Environment, Wesleyan University

Professor Ulysse explores the border zones between ethnography and performance, and discusses as she puts it, why we need the visceral in the structural to participate in the decolonizing project of accessing and reclaiming a full subject.
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Professor Ulysse is currently working on a montage ethnography, C'est Mon Devoir (It is My Duty): Stories of Civic Engagement, Urban Degradation and the Earthquake in Haiti.

Please RSVP at: http://bit.ly/g8Np0K

Sponsored by the Institute for Global and International Studies, the Culture in Global Affairs Program, and the Global Gender Initiative Program, and the University Seminar in Performance

Friday, March 4, 2011
6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

CANCELED: Because When God is too Busy: Haiti, Me, and the World


Dr. Gina Athena Ulysse, Associate Professor of Anthropology, African Studies, Environmental Studies, and Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Wesleyan University; Inaugural Fellow, College of the Environment, Wesleyan University

Professor Ulysse's training as a cultural anthropologist informs this dramatic monologue about how Haiti's past occupies its present. She weaves history, personal narrative, theory, and statistics in spoken-word with Vodou chants to reflect and deconstruct childhood memories, social (in)justice, spirituality, and the dehumanization of Haitians.
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Professor Ulysse is currently working on a montage ethnography, <i>C'est Mon Devoir (It Is My Duty): Stories of Civic Engagement, Urban Degradation and the Earthquake in Haiti</i>.

A reception will follow the event.

Please RSVP at: http://bit.ly/eTh3BH

Sponsored by the Institute for Global and International Studies, the Culture in Global Affairs Program, and the Global Gender Initiative Program

Monday, March 7, 2011
5:30 PM - 6:45 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Women Working for Women


Opening Remarks by:
Barbara Miller, Director, Global Gender Initiative

Cybèle Cochran, USAID/Conflict Management and Mitigation

Rachel Flynn, International Medical Corps

Megan Foster, Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN)

Abigail Greenleaf, Global Health, United States Agency for International Development

Monica Suber, United States Peace Corps

Laura Van Voorhees, AED

Moderated by:
Afeefa Syeed, Senior Culture and Development Advisor, Asia and Middle East Bureaus, USAID

In honor of the International Women's Day Centenary, this panel will explore the diverse experiences of women working for women's empowerment.

Light snacks will be provided.

Please RSVP at: http://bit.ly/ijbcPR

Sponsored by the Global Gender Initiative, the Institute for Global and International Studies, and The Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Washington

Monday, March 7, 2011
8:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Room 113
1957 E Street, NW

The Joseph Cedar Film Retrospective: Time of Favor


Yaron Peleg, Associate Professor of Hebrew, GW

Dan Schwartz, Assistant Professor of Modern Jewish History, GW

Yaron Peleg and Dan Schwartz will speak before presenting <i>Time of Favor</i>, Israeli writer-director Joseph Cedar's debut film. The movie plays out a psychologically complex love triangle in the middle of terrorist conflict in Israel's West Bank.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/aTimeOfFavor

Sponsored by the Middle East Policy Forum, which is presented with the generous support of ExxonMobil, and Gelman Library

Tuesday, March 8, 2011
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Monroe Hall, Kendrick Conference Room, Room 321
2115 G Street, NW

Magic Transition? Intergenerational Economic Mobility in Rural China from 1988 to 2002


Yan Sun, The George Washington University

This event is part of the Trade and Development Workshop Series.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/iieptradeworkshop

Sponsored by the Institute for International Economic Policy

Tuesday, March 8, 2011
4:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Media and Public Affairs building, Room 306
805 21st Street, NW

Film Screening: Act of Dishonor


Nelofer Pazira, Director, Act of Dishonor

Join the Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication and Nelofer Pazira, director of <i>Act of Dishonor</i> for a special screening and discussion about the film.
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<i>Act of Dishonour</i> is about honour killing. It is an eloquent and sensitive, though brutal portrait of life in Afghanistan - part lament against injustice, part testament to the spirit of a people who have survived decades of war.

Please RSVP at: http://gwactofdishonor.eventbrite.com/

Sponsored by the Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication and E1 Entertainment

Wednesday, March 9, 2011
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Room 505
1957 E Street, NW

The Promotion of Sustainable Mining and Energy Activities in Peru


Pedro Sanchez Gamarra, Minister, Ministry of Energy and Mines, Peru

Mr. Sánchez Gamarra became Peru's Minister of Energy and Mines in October 2008.  He has led numerous institutions in Peru, including COPRI and ElectroPerú.  He holds M.A. degrees from GW and the Escuela de Administración de Negocios para Graduados (ESAN).

Please RSVP at: http://tiny.cc/406al

Sponsored by the Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Program

Wednesday, March 9, 2011
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Remembering Indonesia's War of Independence: Identity, Politics, and Military History


Ronald Spector, Professor of History and International Affairs

Professor Spector received his B.A. from Johns Hopkins University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Yale University.

He has served in various government positions and on active duty in the Marine Corps from 1967-1969 and 1983-1984, and was the first civilian to become Director of Naval History and the head of the Naval Historical Center. He has served on the faculties of Louisiana State University, Alabama, and Princeton and has been a senior Fulbright lecturer in India and Israel. In 1995-1996 he was Distinguished Visiting Professor of Strategy at the National War College and was the Distinguished Guest Professor at Keio University, Tokyo in 2000.

At the Elliott School, Professor Spector offers undergraduate and graduate courses on US-East Asia Relations, World War II, and the Vietnam War as well as a graduate seminar on Naval history and one on strategy.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/SpectorMar9

This event is part of the Sigur Center's Faculty Lecture Series.

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Wednesday, March 9, 2011
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Room 505
1957 E Street, NW

Rock and Roll, Disco Mafia, and the Collapse of Communism


Sergei Zhuk, Associate Professor of History, Ball State University

Taras Kuzio, Visiting Fellow, Center for Transatlantic Relations, School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University

How did rock and disco music contribute to the fall of communism and the rise of post-Soviet capitalism? Why did Westernization during the two decades before the USSR collapse lead to Russification? This presentation and discussion will analyze the cultural history of an important closed Soviet city, home to the 'Dnipropetrovsk mafia' that ran the USSR and Soviet Ukraine from the 1960s to the 1980s, the rise of a new post-Soviet business and political elite from the Komsomol-run discos and businesses (including Yulia Tymoshenko, Sergei Tigipko, and others) and the language question and Westernization in the media environment of independent Ukraine.
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Sergei Zhuk teaches Russian and East European history at Ball State University. He is the author of numerous works, including his most recent book, <i>Rock and Roll in the Rocket City: The West, Identity, and Ideology in Soviet Dniepropetrovsk, 1960-1985</i>.
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Taras Kuzio has analyzed Soviet, post-Soviet, and Ukrainian affairs for the last two decades in various positions and edits the monthly<i>Ukraine Analyst</i>. He is currently an Austrian Marshall Plan Foundation Fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations, School of Advanced International Studies, John Hopkins University, where he is researching Ukrainian foreign and energy policies and writing a contemporary history of Ukraine.

This event is part of the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies' Petrach Program on Ukraine

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Thursday, March 10, 2011
4:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Room 505
1957 E Street, NW

Bloodlands: Europe between Hitler and Stalin


Timothy Snyder, Professor of History, Yale University

In the lands between Berlin and Moscow, some fourteen million people were killed from 1933 to 1945 by German and Soviet policy. Professor Snyder will discuss the major killing policies, from Soviet terror through the Holocaust, with special attention to the overlap and interaction of Soviet and German power in the Bloodlands: western Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Poland, and the Baltics.
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Timothy Snyder is professor of history at Yale University, specializing in the political history of central and eastern Europe. He received his B.A. from Brown University and his doctorate from the University of Oxford, where he was a British Marshall Scholar. He has also held fellowships in Paris, Warsaw, and at Harvard University, where he was an Academy Scholar. Among his many publications are five books: <i>Nationalism, Marxism, and Modern Central Europe: A Biography of Kazimierz Kelles-Krauz </i>(1998); <i>The Reconstruction of Nations: Poland, Ukraine, Lithuania, Belarus, 1569-1999 </i> (2003); <i>Sketches from a Secret War: A Polish Artist's Mission to Liberate Soviet Ukraine </i> (2005);<i> The Red Prince: The Secret Lives of a Habsburg Archduke </i>(2008); and <i>Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin </i>(2010).

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Thursday, March 10, 2011
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Room B-17
1957 E Street, NW

Targeting Arab Cities: Military and Architectural Expertise and the Moralization of the Politics of Empire


Ahmed Kanna is the Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of the Pacific School of International Studies. His publications include Dubai: The City as Corporation (2011, University of Minnesota Press), "Flexible Citizenship in Dubai: Neoliberal Subjectivity in the Emerging City Corporation," Cultural Anthropology, 2010 and Rethinking Cities and Communities in the Global Era, co-edited with Xiangming Chen (forthcoming, Routledge Press).

Ahmed Kanna will discuss a contemporary, post-neoliberal and Global War on Terror conjuncture in which the issue of urbanism and, in particular the global south city, is becoming a central object expertise. In particular, cities in the Middle East and South/Central Asia have become central in Western, and particularly U.S., discourses of security, neoliberalism, and cultural representation. The first decade of the 21st century seems to have created two Middle Eastern archetypes in the imaginations of Western military and architectural experts: Dubai and Baghdad/Gaza, or, the urban blank slate/architectural laboratory versus the city as object of military discipline. In this paper, he will look at the ways in which cities, or the image of cities, do "cultural work" in the moralization of the politics of U.S. and neoliberal empire.

The IMES Lecture Series is supported by the U.S. Department of Education Title VI grant for National Resource Centers.

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/66rjg3n

Sponsored by the Institute for Middle East Studies

Friday, March 11, 2011
8:00 AM - 4:45 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS)


Maggie Chen, Assistant Professor of Economics and International Affairs, GW

J. Bradford Jensen, Associate Professor of International Business and Economics, McDonough School of Business, Georgetown University

Hiau Looi Kee, Senior Economist, Trade Team of the World Bank Research Department

Pravin Krishna, Chung Ju Yung Distinguished Professor of International Economics and Business, Johns Hopkins University (SAIS)

Mine Senses, Assistant Professor of International Economics, Johns Hopkins University (SAIS)

Nuno Limão, Associate Professor of Economics, University of Maryland

Benjamin Mendel, Economist, Trade and Quantitative Studies Section, Division of International Finance, Federal Reserve Board

The Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) is a forum that highlights cutting edge trade research at leading economic institutions in the Washington D.C. area. Its primary activity is sponsoring an annual research conference where scholars present their latest work. Researchers from The George Washington University, University of Maryland, Georgetown University, Johns Hopkins University (SAIS), the World Bank, and the Federal Reserve are all participants in the symposium.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/WAITSconference

Sponsored by the Elliott School of International Affairs, University of Maryland, Georgetown University, Johns Hopkins University (SAIS), the World Bank, and the Federal Reserve

Thursday, March 17, 2011
7:30 AM - 9:30 PM

2nd Floor
1957 E Street, NW

19th Annual Symposium of the Society for Nonlinear Dynamics and Econometrics


James Bullard, President and Chief Executive Officer, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Enrique Mendoza, Professor of Economics, University of Maryland

John Williams, Director of Research, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco

Tao Zha, Director, Center for Quantitative Economic Research, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

The aim of the conference is to present and discuss recent developments in theoretical and empirical analysis of nonlinearity in economics and finance.

Please join us for the second part of the conference:
Friday, March 18, 2011
7:30 am-5:00 pm


Registration for this event is closed.

Sponsored by the Institute for International Economic Policy and the Society for Nonlinear Dynamics and Econometrics

Tuesday, March 22, 2011
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

John W. Kendrick Seminar Room, Room 321
Monroe Hall, 2115 G Street, NW

Is There Surplus Labor in Rural India?


Andrew Foster, Professor and Chair Department of Economics; Professor of Community Health, Brown University

Mark Rosenzweig, Frank Altschul Professor of International Economics; Director, Economic Growth Center, Yale University

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/iieptradeworkshop

Sponsored by the Institute for International Economic Policy (IIEP), and the Department of Economics

Tuesday, March 22, 2011
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

Why Do Governments (Really) Join the International Criminal Court?


Medlir Mema, Guest Scholar, Swedish National Defense College

Why do governments join the International Criminal Court? Some argue that governments ratify the Rome Treaty to appear as members in good standing of the international community. Citing the risks associated with the ratification of the treaty, others have suggested that governments join the ICC to make their commitment to reduce civil disobedience credible by tying their own hands not only to prosecute fairly but also to be prosecuted. Medlir Mema will argue that while joining the ICC can be potentially costly, given the principle of complementarity and the Court's need for the protections guaranteed under the Agreement on Privileges and Immunities, states still have many safeguards against the Court. Moreover, participating in the negotiations and deliberations of the Court's jurisdiction provides two important benefits for these states. At the domestic level, they can use the ICC to legitimize the prosecution of their political opponents as well as use the possibility of a self-referral to the ICC for leverage in negotiations; while at the international level, the establishment and strengthening of the Court is seen as a means to weakening the UN Security Council's hold on the trigger for situations involving the crime of aggression.
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Medlir Mema is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science at The George Washington University. He is currently a Guest Scholar at the Swedish National Defense College after being awarded a year-long Guest Scholarship from the Swedish Institute. From 2007-2010, Medlir worked as a Graduate Research Fellow at IERES. In 2006, Medlir earned an M.A. in European Studies and International Economics from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS).

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Tuesday, March 22, 2011
6:10 PM - 7:30 PM

Harry Harding Auditorium, Room 213
1957 E Street, NW

Thirst: Long Term Solutions to the Global Clean Water Crisis


Roberto Lenton, Former Co-Chair, UN Millennium Project Task Force on Water and Sanitation; Former Director, UNDP Sustainable Energy and Environment Division

David Winder, CEO, WaterAid America

Greg Allgood, Director, Children's Safe Drinking Water Program, Procter & Gamble

A panel to celebrate World Water Day and discuss challenges to achieving clean water.

Refreshments to follow.

RSVP: oidgwu@gmail.com

Sponsored by the Organization for International Development and the International Development Studies program

Wednesday, March 23, 2011
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

The Problem of National Identity and Ethnic Tolerance in Ukraine


Larysa Zasekina, Fulbright Scholar, University of Central Arkansas; Professor and Department Chair of General and Social Psychology, Lesya Ukrainka Volyn National University, Lutsk, Ukraine

Ukraine is a multi-cultural country and the issues of national identity and ethnic tolerance are of considerable importance today. This lecture will lay out a personality-centered approach to national identity and ethnic tolerance. It will then examine the results of empirical research among students in western, eastern, and southern regions of Ukraine, with a specific emphasis on Crimea. It will highlight the balance between ethnic tolerance and xenophobia in the Ukrainian media. Additionally, it will examine the impact of bilingualism and the Soviet past on contemporary understandings of national identity and ethnic tolerance in Ukraine.
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Larisa Zasyekina is Professor and Chair of the Department of General and Social Psychology at Lesya Ukrainka Volyn National University in Lutsk, Ukraine. She is currently a Fulbright Professor at the University of Central Arkansas.

This event is part of IERES' Petrach Program on Ukraine

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Thursday, March 24, 2011
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

A Strategy of Nuclear Disarmament: Envisioning a World Free of Nuclear Weapons


Anne Harrington de Santana, Nuclear Security Fellow, Stanford University

In this presentation, Harrington de Santana demonstrates that any plan to eliminate nuclear weapons must start from the premise that nuclear disarmament is a strategy, not a goal or a destination defined as zero nuclear weapons. Rather than concentrating on what a world free of nuclear weapons, it is necessary to begin by articulating a positive description of what it contains. Contrary to the conventional wisdom, she argues that nuclear weapons are destructive because they explode, but they are powerful because the practices of deterrence and nonproliferation link their destructive capacity to rational political ends. By filling the void at the center of current U.S. nuclear strategy with an account of how our experience of nuclear weapons as powerful is created and maintained by the institutions of deterrence and nonproliferation, and therefore not reducible to the material characteristics of nuclear weapons alone, it becomes possible to imagine maintaining our current confidence in the social institutions while slowly reducing the relative importance of the material characteristics of the nuclear weapons themselves.

Please RSVP at: http://bit.ly/hmI24E

Sponsored by Nuclear Policy Talks, the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, and the Institute for Security and Conflict Studies

Thursday, March 24, 2011
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

Russia's Energy Strategy Abroad


Adnan Vatansever, Senior Associate, Energy and Climate Program, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Adnan Vatansever will examine Russia's role as the world's leading fossil fuel exporter, focusing on Moscow's oil export strategy, highlighting the principal developments with regard to its export capacity, and examining the key challenges faced by Russia's gas industry amidst increasingly competitive global and regional gas markets.  
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Adnan Vatansever is a senior associate in the Energy and Climate Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He specializes in the energy sectors of the former Soviet republics and Eastern Europe, with a particular focus on energy efficiency and carbon reduction, energy security, and Russia's economic diversification. Before joining Carnegie, he worked as a senior associate for Cambridge Energy Research Associates (IHS CERA), specializing in the oil and gas industries in Eurasia. His most recent areas of research include crude transportation and export dynamics in Eurasia, Russia's tax and regulatory environment for the oil sector, Turkey's role as an energy transit country, and energy scenarios for Russia. He has worked for the World Bank, where he developed a research framework for the management of oil and gas revenues in resource-rich countries, and advised the Turkish government on reforming Turkey's gas market.  He also served as an energy consultant for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy, advising on gas transportation projects for Central Asia.  Vatansever received a Ph.D. from the  School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University, an M.A. from Georgetown University, and a B.A. from Middle East Technical University.

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Monday, March 28, 2011
12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

After the Earthquake and Tsunami: Japan's Nuclear, Economic, and Political Challenges


Analysis of the Nuclear Threat:
Philippe Bardet, Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, GW

Prospects for the Japanese and Regional Economies:
James Kilpatrick, Adjunct Professor of Economics and International Affairs, GW

Political Implications for the Japanese Government:
Llewelyn Hughes, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, GW

Moderated by:
Shawn McHale, Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, GW

This event will be available via a live webcast at http://elliott.gwu.edu/news/events/tsunami.cfm

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/JapanMar28

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Monday, March 28, 2011
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Room 505
1957 E Street, NW

Spent Fuel Reprocessing


Thomas Shea, Nuclear Consultant

The relevance of non-proliferation, international safeguards, energy security, environmental protection, the prevention of nuclear terrorism and nuclear disarmament on national and global policies affecting whether, when and how reprocessing should go forward.

Please RSVP at: http://bit.ly/gfmySc

Sponsored by Institute for Security and Conflict Studies and the Nuclear Policy Talks

Monday, March 28, 2011
6:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Jack Morton Auditorium,
School of Media and Public Affairs
805 21st St NW

Libya: The Road Map to Freedom


Marah Bukai, Founder and President, Al Waref Institute

Fadel Lamen, President, American-Libyan Council

Ambassador Ali Aujali, Former Ambassador of Libya to the United States

Doors open at 5:30 PM and attendees must be seated by 6:20 PM. ID required.

Please RSVP at: http://libya-at-gw.eventbrite.com

Sponsored by the International Affairs Society, with support from the Institute for Middle East Studies

Monday, March 28, 2011
6:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Sigur Center, Suite 503
1957 E Street, NW

Asian Film Week: Homerun (Singapore)


Homerun is a drama about two poor siblings and their adventures over a lost pairs of shoes. Set in 1965, the year Singapore separated from Malaysia, the film satirizes political relations between the two countries, which lead to its banning in Malaysia. It was nominated for two awards at the 2003 Golden Horse Awards; Megan Zheng, then 10, became the first Singaporean to win a Golden Horse.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/OASasianfilmweek

Sponsored by the Organization of Asian Studies and the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Tuesday, March 29, 2011
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Peru's 2011 Elections: Perspectives on the Campaign and Prospects for the First Round


Carlos Indacochea, Professorial Lecturer, GW

Cynthia McClintock, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs; Director, Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Program, GW

Coletta Youngers, Senior Fellow, The Washington Office on Latin America

Discussion of the upcoming Peruvian presidential and congressional elections.

Please RSVP at: http://tiny.cc/peru2011election

Sponsored by the Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Program

Tuesday, March 29, 2011
5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Princes, Brokers, and Bureaucrats: Oil and the State in Saudi Arabia


Steffen Hertog, Lecturer of Comparative Politics, London School of Economics and Political Science

Steffen Hertog will present remarks on his latest book: <i>Princes, Brokers, and Bureaucrats: Oil and the State in Saudi Arabia</i>.

A wine reception will follow the event at 6:00 PM.

A limited number of copies of the book will be available for GW students to be signed by the author following the event.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/6x62axk

Sponsored by Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS) and the Institute for Middle East Studies (IMES)

Tuesday, March 29, 2011
6:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Sigur Center, Suite 503
1957 E Street, NW

Asian Film Week: Love of Siam (Thailand)


A groundbreaking teen love story, Love of Siam is a moving gay romance that took Thailand by storm. When childhood neighbors and friends Mew and Tong are reunited after several years, they must decide if their feelings for one another are as friends, or something more. The film dominated Thailand's 2007 film awards season, winning the Best Picture category at all major national film award events, including the Thailand National Film Association Awards.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/OASasianfilmweek

Sponsored by the Organization of Asian Studies and the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Wednesday, March 30, 2011
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

The Oracles of Proliferation


Benoît Pelopidas, Postdoctoral Fellow, James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies

Robert S. Norris, Senior Research Associate, Natural Resources Defense Council

Leonard S. Spector, Deputy Director, James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies

By examining via a case study the political authority of US proliferation experts since the 1960s, this article contributes to nuclear weapons proliferation studies and to the growing literature on the role of expertise in democracies. First, it argues that policy choices are determined by an understanding of history and that approaching nuclear history as a history of nuclear weapons proliferation is a presumption shared by both US experts and policy makers. Second, it shows that this understanding of history, relying on the metaphorical use of the term proliferation (which was imported from biology), strongly distorts the facts. Third, the article shows that nuclear experts are plagued by a conservative bias as a result of this use of the proliferation metaphor. Instead of challenging the faulty proliferation narrative, most experts have backed it without question. Fourth, the legitimacy that experts lend to this view of history has important political effects: it provides an authoritative assessment of past policies and limits the possibility of political innovation. Policy initiatives tend to be restricted to changes in speed or intensity. The article suggests three changes that might restore room for informed political innovation in nuclear weapons policies.

RSVP: NonproliferationReview@gmail.com

Sponsored by Institute for Security and Conflict Studies, Nuclear Policy Talks, and the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies

Wednesday, March 30, 2011
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Room 505
1957 E Street, NW

Human Rights and the European Union: Immigration Policies


Frank Schmiedel, First Secretary of Political, Justice and Home Affairs, Delegation of the European Union

Frank Schmiedel will discuss immigration policy in the European Union giving focus to the immigration situation as a result of the unrest in the Middle East and North Africa.
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Frank Schmiedel is in charge of justice and home affairs at the Washington D.C. Delegation of the European Union. He studied economics and political science in Germany, business administration in France and holds a Ph.D. in economics from a French university. Before joining the European Commission in 2001, Schmiedel worked for multinational companies and as a management consultant. In the Commission he worked on single market issues (2001-2003), external relations with China and Mongolia (2003-2007) and since 2007 in the Political, Security and Development Section of the Washington Delegation.

RSVP: peers@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Professionals in European, Eurasian, and Russian Studies (PEERS), the Human Rights Law Society, and the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Wednesday, March 30, 2011
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Muslims in America


Jonathan Hayden, Program Coordinator, School of International Service, American University

Frankie Martin, Ibn Khaldun Chair Research Fellow, School of International Service, American University

Please join the Conflict Resolution Forum and the Graduate Student Forum for excerpts and discussion from the documentary, <i>Journey into America</i>.  Led by documentary principles, Jonathan Hayden and Frankie Martin, we will be discussing the role and diversity of Muslims in the United States.

Refreshments will follow.

RSVP: crf@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Conflict Resolution Forum and Graduate Student Forum

Wednesday, March 30, 2011
6:30 PM - 8:10 PM

Sigur Center, Suite 503
1957 E Street, NW

Asian Film Week: Mongolian Ping Pong (Mongolia)


A ping pong ball, found floating in a stream, becomes the source of wonderment for three young boys who live in the remote grasslands of Mongolia. Bilike, the ball's discoverer, assumes it's a bird's egg. His wizened grandmother proclaims it a magic pearl. Unconvinced, the boys take the ball to the monastery, but even the grasslands' most knowledgeable inhabitants are stumped. When a television show reveals that the object is the "national ball of China," the determined young scouts decide to embark upon a journey to return the precious talisman to the Chinese capital.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/OASasianfilmweek

Sponsored by the Organization of Asian Studies and the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Wednesday, March 30, 2011
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Room 505
1957 E Street, NW

Women, Reconstruction, and the Challenges of Civil Society in Afghanistan


Rangina Hamidi, Founder, Kandahar Treasure

Palwasha Hassan, Women's Rights Activist; Founder, Afghan Women's Network; Fellow, United States Institute of Peace

Patricia Liedl, Journalist; Independent Media Consultant

Mariam Atash Nawabi, Founding Member, Afghanistan Advocacy Group

Barmak Pahzwak, Afghanistan Program Officer, United States Institute of Peace; Former Senior International Adviser to the Minister of Rural Rehabilitation and Development, Afghanistan

This roundtable features speakers from Afghanistan, Canada, and the U.S. who will discuss the challenges, successes, and failures of various aspects of reconstruction in Afghanistan as it relates in particular to women and girls. The war in Afghanistan has become a staple of daily news in the US, yet there has been comparatively less discussion about the successes and failures of non-military strategies for stabilizing and rebuilding Afghanistan that are being pursued. Even less discussion has revolved around the question of how women have contributed to these pursuits, and with what results.
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The discussion pivots on five thematic points: building civil society, political participation, security, advocacy, and business and enterprise.

Please RSVP at: http://womenandreconstruction.eventbrite.com/

Sponsored by Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication, Department of Religion, the Women's Studies Program, the School of Media and Public Affairs (SMPA), the Afghan Students' Association (ASA)

Thursday, March 31, 2011
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Rabindranath Tagore Memorial Concert


Sudeshna Basu, Vocal and Harmonium

Debu Nayak, Tabla

Jeff Bauer, Piano

Nistha Raj, Violin

Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941) was an Indian poet, philosopher, academician, composer, visionary and much more. He wrote 12 Novels, 3000 poems, 2025 songs, innumerable short stories, essays, letters and plays. He was the first Asian to win the Noble prize in 1913.

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The Sigur Center will host a memorial concert featuring traditional Indian music in honor of the 150 years since Rabindranath Tagore's birth.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/TagoreMar31

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Thursday, March 31, 2011
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

Collapse: Why Some Asylum Systems Succeed While Others Fail


Ridvan Peshkopia, Visiting Scholar, Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (IERES), GW

A comparison between the poorly functioning Greek asylum system and the highly regarded Albanian system leads to the question: Why do some asylum systems succeed while others fail? Ridvan Peshkopia will argue that, unless countries need asylum systems to deal with an influx of asylum seekers, they have no incentives to establish such institutions. As an alternative to building asylum systems, governments prefer to allow and even encourage asylum seekers to leave for more lucrative countries. When that is not possible, governments prefer to tighten their border controls. Therefore, establishing operational and efficient asylum systems is governments' least preferred alternative. Governments are willing to abide their countries' international obligations as long as such obligations do not require excessive efforts and resources; in cases where respecting the 1951 Geneva Convention becomes more economically and politically expensive than defecting, governments defect by switching their focus from refugee protection to border control. This argument applies to the EU as well.
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Ridvan Peshkopia received an M.A. from the University of Kentucky's Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce, an M.A. from the University of Kentucky's College of Arts and Sciences, and a Graduate Certificate in Managing International Conflicts from the University of Kentucky Martin School of Public Policy and Administration. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate in political science with the University of Kentucky, an adjunct instructor with the University of New York Tirana, and a visiting scholar at IERES. His articles have appeared in <i>Theoria: A Journal of Social and Political Theory</i>; <i>New Political Science</i>; <i>The International Journal of Human Rights</i>; <i>Albanian Journal of Politics</i>; <i>Southeast European Politics</i>; <i>Southeast European and Black Sea Studies</i>; and <i>Forced Migration Review</i>

This event is part of the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies' Visiting Scholar Roundtable Series

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Thursday, March 31, 2011
6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Harry Harding Auditorium, Room 213
1957 E Street, NW

A Night of Film from Haiti's Ciné Institute


The International Affairs Review is excited to host a screening of selected works from Haiti's Cine Institute including their latest documentary, <i>Maswife: Life in Camp Pinchinat</i>, a collective film from a group of five students who lived for months in Camp Pinchinat, one of Haiti's 1200 tent cities and Jacmel's largest camp, amongst over 1000 families displaced by the January 2010 earthquake. The documentary recently premiered at the 2010 International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam, one of the leading documentary festivals in the world, where it received critical acclaim.
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The International Affairs Review presents these films in connection with the launch of its 2nd annual Winter Web Edition that looks at the building blocks of growth, the role of the international community, and the development outlook for countries around the world. <i>Maswife</i> and the accompanying short film series highlight the efforts of the local population in improving the lives of those in the community and in helping Haiti reach its development goals from the ground up.
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For more information about <i>Maswife: Life in Camp Pinchinat</i> please check out the trailer at: <a href="http://vimeo.com/14860216">http://vimeo.com/14860216</a>

Refreshments available from 6:00 PM.

RSVP: iar@gwu.edu

Sponsored by International Affairs Review and the Ciné Institute

Thursday, March 31, 2011
6:30 PM - 8:40 PM

Sigur Center, Suite 503
1957 E Street, NW

Asian Film Week: The Battle of Narayama (Japan)


In a small village in a remote valley, everyone who reaches the age of 70 is banished to the top of Mt. Narayama to die, so as not to be a burden on the village and bring disgrace upon their family. Old Orin is 69, and despite being in good health, in the coming winter it will be her turn to leave. But first, there are a few things that need doing. The Battle of Narayama won the 1983 Palm d'Or and is one of the most important works of celebrated Japanese filmmaker Shohei Imamura.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/OASasianfilmweek

Sponsored by the Organization of Asian Studies and the Sigur Center for Asian Studies