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Events Calendar Archive

May 2014

Thursday, May 1, 2014
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Elliott School, Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

CANCELLED: Energy, Russian Power and Populism in the Shadow of Ukraine: A Presentation of Living the High Life in Minsk


Margarita M. Balmaceda, Seton Hall University

Living the High Life in Minsk: Russian Energy Rents, Domestic Populism and Belarus' Impending Crisis (Budapest: Central European University Press, 2014) explores the issue of authoritarian resilience and the counter-power of weaker allies vs. more powerful ones. It does so by analyzing the role of energy relations, policies, and discourses as factors of stability and conflict in the management of president Aleksandr Lukashenko's relationship with three constituencies key to the resilience of his regime: Russian actors, the Belarusian nomenklatura, and the Belarusian electorate.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/MBBelarus

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (IERES)

Thursday, May 1, 2014
4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Elliott School, Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Revolution and Art in the Kyrgyz Republic


Sally Cummings, St. Andrews University in London

Professor Sally Nikoline Cummings teaches in the School of International Relations, University of St Andrews. Her more recent publications include Understanding Central Asia (2012), Sovereignty after Empire: Comparing the Middle East and Central Asia (co-ed, 2012) and Symbolism and Power in Central Asia: Politics of the Spectacular (ed. 2010). In late 2009 she commissioned two prominent Kyrgyz artists to develop over a three-year period twelve visual art exhibits that captured the emotions surrounding the 2005 transfer of power. The resulting exhibition, (&) Ketsin!, premiered in London in May 2013. Professor Cummings narrates here the story of this exhibition and what it tells us about political intention and art, the nature of the 2005 events and the artist in times of political upheaval.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/cummings

Sponsored by the Central Asia Program and IERES

Friday, May 2, 2014
8:00 AM - 7:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E St NW

Who Owns Haiti? Sovereignty in a Fragile State: 2004-2014


Thomas C. Adams, U.S. Department of State

Caroline Anstey, The World Bank

F. Carl Braun, Unibank S.A.

Laurent Dubois, Duke University

Turneb Delpe, Political Activist

Luigi Einaudi, National Defense University

Robert Fatton, University of Virginia

Colin Granderson, CARICOM

Olsen Jean-Julien, Cultural Conservationist

Chelsey Kivland, Dartmouth College

Jacky Lumarque, Quisqueya University [Haiti]

Richard A. Morse, Musician

Francois Pierre-Louis, Queens College CUNY

Karen Richman, University of Notre Dame

Ricardo Seitenfus, U.F. de Santa Maria [Brazil]

Donald Steinberg, World Learning

Gabriel J. Verret, Economic Policy Consultant

Amy Wilentz, University of California Irvine

A day long symposium that will address the issue of Haitian sovereignty through the lenses of: Governance, Economic and Human Development; Cultural Heritage; and Politics and the International Community.

Registration and light refreshments begin at 8AM. Refreshments provided between panels. Reception with participants to follow.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/WOH

Sponsored by the Focus On Haiti Initiative, the Brazil Initiative, and the Elliott School S.O.A.R. Grant

Tuesday, May 6, 2014
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Elliott School, Room 501

The Special Court for Sierra Leone: Political Justice?


Chris Mahony, Research Fellow, Centre for International Law Research and Policy and recently completed doctoral candidate in Politics at Keble College, Oxford

This paper traces the case selection at the Special Court for Sierra Leone through the Court's design to the interests behind its establishment. The paper illuminates how alignment of previously opposing British and US regional policy, facilitated conclusion of the conflict by foreign-backed force, and pursuit of transitional justice processes to reinforce that military outcome. After collusion between the British government and Senator Judd Gregg, the Clinton administration changed its policy from one supporting Liberian President Charles Taylor, to one opposing him. The Special Court for Sierra Leone formed part of a multi pronged US policy to remove Charles Taylor from power - a project that included economic isolation and tacit support of an armed insurgency. These geopolitical underpinnings instructed the Special Court's design, undermining the possibility of an impartial and fair criminal justice process while subjugating the role of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. I conclude by considering the comparative case selection independence of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and the International Criminal Court. That comparative analysis indicates whether international criminal justice independence appears to be strengthening or weakening.

RSVP: http://bit.ly/1iVm7iO

Sponsored by the Africa Working Group of IGIS

Tuesday, May 6, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Elliott School, Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

The Stop Fake Movement in Ukraine: Civic Media Initiatives and The Role of Journalism Education in Developing Democracies


Tetyana Lokot, Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland

The Russian incursion in Crimea has been accompanied by a barrage of propaganda, primarily on state-run Russian television. While this is the apotheosis of Russian media logic, its deployment has dangerous consequences for political stability in the region. This talk will examine the nature of Russias information warfare, and demonstrate the well-orchestrated efforts by Ukrainian journalists, journalism educators and civic activists to counter propaganda through debunking initiatives. It will also trace the evolution of other Ukrainian civic media initiatives, both during and before the Euromaidan protest. The speaker argues that the emergence of these independent media initiatives highlights the importance of journalism education in the post-Soviet sphere, both formal and informal, and will discuss the development of journalism education and hence professionalism in Ukraine. People are quick to dismiss journalism training programs in non-free states as pointless or, indeed, counter-productive. The 'Stop Fake' movement demonstrates the fruition of these efforts, providing a critical and authentic voice of Ukrainians at a desperate time.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Lokot

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (IERES)

Tuesday, May 6, 2014
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Whither America: A Foreign Policy Debate Among Realists, Nationalists and Internationalists


Henry Nau, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, GW; Author, Conservative Internationalism: Armed Diplomacy Under Jefferson, Polk, Truman, and Reagan

Michael Lind, Co-Founder, New America Foundation; Author, The American Way of Strategy: U.S. Foreign Policy and the American Way of Life

Ivan Eland, Senior Fellow and Director, Center on Peace and Liberty, The Independent Institute; Author, The Empire Has No Clothes: U.S. Foreign Policy Exposed, Updated Edition

The long wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have sparked renewed debate about foreign policy within both political parties. William Kristol recently said that while Republicans generally agree on domestic policy, the real debate would be on foreign policy. Likewise, in the Democratic party, the more hawkish Clinton wing of the party continues its clash with the more dovish McGovernite wing. To focus on these differences, The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. and The Independent Institute in Oakland, California are hosting a debate among the various foreign policy traditions. Please join us for this necessary and timely debate.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/foreignpolicy

Sponsored by the Elliott School of International Affairs and the Independent Institute

Wednesday, May 7, 2014
12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street NW

Asia's Economic Challenges: Research Findings and Outlook


Robert Weiner, Professor of International Business, Public Policy and Public Administration, and International Affairs, GW

Llewelyn Hughes, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, GW

Jiawen Yang, Professor of International Business and International Affairs, GW

Deepa Ollapally, Research Professor of International Affairs and Associate Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, GW

This is a research seminar sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies' Rising Powers Initiative. The seminar is made possible through the support of the Centers and Institutes Facilitating Fund.

Luncheon from 12:00pm - 12:30pm. Panel Discussion from 12:30pm - 2:00pm.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/CIFF

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies' Rising Powers Initiative

Wednesday, May 7, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Elliott School, Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

The Role of Infrastructure in Migrants' Integration and City Space Transformation: The Case of "Ethnic" Cafes in Moscow


Vera Peshkova, Institute of Sociology, Russian Academy of Sciences

Russia has become an immigration country over the last decade. International migrants in Russia are faced with numerous challenges every day, and not having access to formal services, they develop their own ways to resolve their problems through different types of self-organization. This also leads to the creation of new economic niches and a migrant-oriented infrastructure in the service sector. Adaptive techniques include ethno-immigrant associations, primary-group networks (compatriots and relatives), travel agencies, migrant services agencies, ethnic media, medical centers, grocery stores with special products, and ethnic cafes and clubs. The ethnic cafes in Moscow that are oriented mostly towards immigrants from Central Asia provide a vivid example of the contemporary migrant-oriented infrastructure. If the ethno-cultural characteristics of Moscows social space can change due to migrant-oriented social service infrastructure, this could have important effects on Moscow society, including the formation of enclaves.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Peshkova

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (IERES)

Thursday, May 8, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Elliott School, Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Nation-Building in Saakashvili's Georgia: Evidence from a Matched-Guise Experiment


Christofer Berglund, Uppsala University

After coming to power in the Rose Revolution of November 2003, Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili sought to move away from the divisive ethnic nationalism of the past and integrate Georgia's Armenian and Azerbaijani minorities within the framework of a civic nationalism. But what did integration entail? And were Georgians ready to accept integrated Armenians and Azerbaijanis as equals? This presentation will address these questions, using findings from interviews and data from a socio-linguistic experiment.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Berglund

Sponsored by the Institute for Global and International Studies (IGIS)

Monday, May 12, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Elliott School, Conference Room, Suite 403
1957 E Street NW

Marc Leroy - Google Glass


Marc Leroy, Professor of Computer Science, Stanford

Google Glass is one of the most interesting (and controversial) technological innovations to come along in recent years. Its use, particularly its camera function, raises a whole host of technological, social, ethical, and privacy issues. Marc Levoy, professor of computer science at Stanford who has also played a key role on the Glass project at Google, will be at the Center for International Science and Technology Policy to talk informally with interested students and faculty.

RSVP: Email rbublitz@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Center for International Space and Technology Policy

Monday, May 12, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Elliott School, Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Regional Differences in Individual Risk Attitudes in Ukraine


Yaroslav Prytula, Ivan Franko National University, Lviv

Differences in risk attitudes across individuals might be helpful in explaining differences in their behavior. On the aggregate level, the literature on risk preferences shows that people's view on risks may influence both the economic and political situation in a country or a region. This presentation will examine risk attitudes in the regions of Ukraine based on a representative survey of 6,000 respondents conducted between January and March 2013. The results indicate that the regional differences in risk attitudes identified in the survey are due to cultural differences rather than differences in the current socio-economic situation.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Prytula

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (IERES)

Wednesday, May 14, 2014
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Elliott School, Conference Room 501
1957 E Street NW

Women, Development, and Mental Health in Tanzania: Preliminary Findings from Three Regions


Neely Myers, Research Professor of Anthropology; Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, GW

More research is needed on the mental health of women in settings of rapid cultural, socioeconomic, and environmental change. This presentation will center on data collected in Summer 2013 (including 60 interviews and 7 focus groups) with primarily adult women from three cultural groups (Nyataru, Pare and Maasai) in Tanzania located in three different regions (Arusha, Kilimanjaro, and Singida). The data was collected in partnership with World Vision Tanzania, a development organization that currently claims to be focused on promoting a "Green Revolution in Africa" using microlending, advanced agricultural technologies, mobile technology, and climate change insurance. Many of World Vision's development initiatives target women who are thought to be the biggest game changers in the region. This project looked at places where World Vision had been but no longer visited, a place where they were setting up a new program, and a place where they had been offering this development plan for a few years. This project focused on investigating the ways women described their mental health challenges (broadly speaking) in these different development settings to capture the issues most relevant for them.

RSVP: http://bit.ly/1iJEzOn

Sponsored by the Global Gender Program, Culture in Global Affairs (CIGA), and the Africa Working Group of the Institute for Global and International Studies

Wednesday, May 14, 2014
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Two Decades of Transition in Georgia: Facilitators and Hindrances in the Foreign Dimension


Ketevan "Katie" Chumbadze, Carnegie Research Fellow, IERES

For more than two decades since independence, the Georgian state has faced enormous challenges. Conflicts, wars, and violations slowed the process of desovietization in this small Caucasian country. The path from the chaos of the 1990s to the current system balancing among the state, business, and society and Georgias transition from a failed state into a modern European one were difficult due to the complicated international environment and clash of interests in the region. The speaker will examine the impact of foreign factors on the domestic development of Georgia in the context of exacerbated competition between the West and Russia in Eastern Europe.

This research was supported in part by the Carnegie Research Fellowship Program, which is funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and administered by the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research (NCEEER). The opinions expressed herein are those of the scholar and do not necessarily reflect the views of either the Carnegie Corporation of New York, NCEEER, or the official policy or position of any agency of the Government of Georgia.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/Chumbadze

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (IERES)

Thursday, May 15, 2014
6:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Elliott School, Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Cinema Club Film Screening: The Light Thief


Marlene Laruelle, Director, Central Asia Program, GW

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/light

Sponsored by the Central Asia Program and IERES

Tuesday, May 20, 2014
4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Elliott School, Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Social Media and the Online Debate in Central Asia


Navbahor Imamova, Journalist, Voice of America

The emergence of the Internet and the growing participation of people, especially youth, in social media constitute positive change for Central Asia. Uzbekistan as well as the other four countries in the region - Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Turkmenistan - has become more connected to the world than ever before. Despite wide-ranging political restrictions and bans, the flow of information through social media is unstoppable. While some debate whether these governments could shut down access to social media altogether to curtail politically sensitive discussion, this author contends that by doing so, they would be making a serious and ultimately unsuccessful gamble. What drives the audience is the quality of the content and the way it is communicated. What keeps people engaged is the sense of forward motion, the anticipation of what will come next and having a desire to shape it. The power and promise of social media for Central Asia is that it gives an unprecedented opportunity for critical thinking and the discussion of the region's challenging realities to a wider audience than had hitherto been possible.

RSVP: http://go.gwu.edu/imamova

Sponsored by the Central Asia Program and the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (IERES)

Friday, May 30, 2014
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Elliott School, Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street NW

Myth and Rhetoric of the Turkish Model: Changing Notions of Marginality in Turkey


Anita Sengupta, Fellow, Maulana Abul Kalam Azad Institute of Asian Studies, Kolkata, India

Dr. Sengupta will discuss the Turkish Model or the Turkish Developmental Alternative, which was promoted in the Central Asian Republics immediately following the dissolution of the Soviet Union. The Model emphasized the ideal of a "secular, democratic, liberal society" as a model for the post-Soviet Turkic world and in the process encouraged a "Turkic" rhetoric that emphasized connection between the two regions based on a common ancestry. This presentation questions the myth and rhetoric of a model that emerges in the face of transitions and recedes as alternatives emerge from within.

RSVP: go.gwu.edu/Sengupta

Sponsored by the Central Asia Program and the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (IERES)