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Events Calendar Archive

April 2011

Friday, April 1, 2011
12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Room 505
1957 E Street, NW

Preventing Nuclear Terrorism: International Law and Policy Challenges


Emma Belcher, Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations

GW Global Zero and the GW Roosevelt Institute will have the honor of hosting Emma Belcher, a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, for a special talk on nuclear terrorism. Dr. Belcher will speak about the relationship between nuclear terrorism and international law, and the important policy implications it poses.
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Emma Belcher recently served as a research fellow at Harvard University's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. Previously, she was a policy adviser to the Australian prime minister and cabinet on international and national security and a public affairs officer at the Embassy of Australia in Washington, D.C. Her research focuses on nuclear nonproliferation and disarmament, export controls, WMD terrorism, and the intersection between international relations and international law.

Please RSVP at: http://bit.ly/ij8tXf

Sponsored by the Nuclear Policy Talks, GW Global Zero, and the GW Roosevelt Institute

Friday, April 1, 2011
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

John W. Kendrick Seminar Room, Room 321
2115 G Street, NW

Targeting the Poor: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia


Rema Hanna, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Harvard University

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/iieptradeworkshop

Sponsored by Institute for International Economic Policy and the Department of Economics

Friday, April 1, 2011
6:30 PM - 9:10 PM

Sigur Center, Suite 503
1957 E Street, NW

Asian Film Week: 3 Idiots (India)


Two friends embark on a quest for a lost buddy in this 2009 Indian comedy. Along the way, they encounter a long forgotten bet, a wedding they must crash, and a funeral that goes impossibly out of control. 3 Idiots is the highest-grossing Bollywood film of all time in India, and it has won six Filmfare Awards, including best film and best director, ten Star Screen Awards, and sixteen IIFA awards.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/OASasianfilmweek

Sponsored by the Organization of Asian Studies and the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Monday, April 4, 2011
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

"The Last Time We Were at Zero"


George Quester, J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Visiting Professor of International Affairs, GW

George Quester will give a lecture on his book project titled "The Last Time We Were at Global-Zero".
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George H. Quester is the J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Visiting Professor of International Affairs at The George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs. He is one of the most distinguished scholars in the field of international security studies, having published a dozen single-authored books and ten edited books and textbooks over the course of his career. He is especially noted for his work on nuclear weapons and arms control.
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Professor Quester has held appointments at Harvard University, Cornell University, the National War College, the United States Naval Academy, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. Most recently, he was professor of government and politics at the University of Maryland in College Park.
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Professor Quester's publications include: <i>Deterrence Before Hiroshima </i>(1966, reissued 1986), <i>The Politics of Nuclear Proliferation</i> (1973), <i>The Future of Nuclear Deterrence</i> (1986), <i>Nuclear Monopoly</i>(2000), <i>Offense and Defense in the International System</i> (2003, 3rd ed.), <i>Nuclear First Strike: Consequences of a Broken Taboo</i> (2005), and <i>Preemption, Prevention and Proliferation: the Threat and Use of Weapons In History</i> (2009). He is currently working on a book project,<i> The Last Time We Were at Global-Zero</i>, funded by the Smith Richardson Foundation for 2010-11.

Please RSVP at: http://bit.ly/Quester

Sponsored by the Institute for Security and Conflict Studies and the Nuclear Policy Talks

Tuesday, April 5, 2011
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Monroe Hall, Kendrick Conference Room, Room 321
2115 G Street, NW

Skill Biased Heterogeneous Firms: Trade Liberalization and the Skill Premium Redux


Ariell Reshef, Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Virginia

This event is part of the Institute for International Economic Policy's Trade and Development Workshop Series.

RSVP: iiep@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Department of Economics and the Institute for International Economic Policy

Tuesday, April 5, 2011
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

The Chung-wen Shih Conference Room, Suite 503
1957 E Street, NW

The Japan "Peace for Vietnam" Committee (Beheiren), American Deserters, and the U.S. Response, 1967-1968


Masaki Hirata, Fulbright Scholar and Associate Professor, Nagoya City University

Major historians who study the American anti-Vietnam War movements agree that peace advocates raised the social costs of U.S. intervention in Vietnam and were the catalyst and driving force for U.S. withdrawal. In contrast to these positive interpretations of the U.S. peace movements, the impact of the movements in Japan is underestimated. Although recently there has been academic research on anti-war activities by the Japan Peace for Vietnam Committee (Beheiren), they focus on discussing this group's ideological and philosophical character in the context of the history of leftwing activism in Japan. Beheiren activism was unique in introducing various international approaches. Yet there is no serious analysis under this perspective. As a diplomatic historian, I will explore Beheiren's political and military impact in the context of international relations. Beheiren leadership recognized the importance of resistance among American servicemen and for years carried on an extensive program of aiding deserters and leafleting servicemen on leave from Vietnam. In this presentation, I will describe what I have found from declassified US military investigative records on Beheiren's assisting American deserters.

The Visiting Scholar Roundtable is open to GW students, faculty, and staff only.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/VSroundtables

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Tuesday, April 5, 2011
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Room 505
1957 E Street, NW

Eastern European Energy Policy


Ambassador Keith C. Smith, Senior Associate, New European Democracies project, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS)

Andris Spruds,Visiting Fellow, Center for Transatlantic Relations, Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS)

Discussant:
Stefan Hedlund, Visiting Scholar, Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

The speakers will discuss Russia's role as a major energy supplier to Eastern and Central Europe, providing their perspectives on how to resolve issues related to energy security in the region.
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Ambassador Keith C. Smith is currently a senior associate at the CSIS New European Democracies Project. He retired from the US Department of State in 2000, where his career focused primarily on European affairs. He was US ambassador to Lithuania from 1997 to 2000, with additional posts in Europe including Hungary (twice), Norway, and Estonia.
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Dr. Spruds is an associate professor at Riga Stradins University and an adjunct professor at Wyzsza Szkola Biznesu-National Louis University in Nowy Sacz, Poland. He also heads the Latvian Institute of International Affairs. His research interests focus on energy security and policy in the Baltic Sea region, domestic and foreign policies of post-Soviet countries, and transatlantic relations.

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Tuesday, April 5, 2011
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Empire of Humanity: A History of Humanitarianism


Michael N. Barnett, University Professor of International Affairs and Political Science, GW

Professor Michael Barnett will discuss his forthcoming book, <em>Empire of Humanity</em>, which explores humanitarianism's remarkable growth from its humble origins in the early nineteenth century to its current prominence in global life.

6:30 PM - 7:30 PM Lecture
7:30 PM - 8:00 PM Reception and Book Signing

RSVP: http://tiny.cc/5gje1

Sponsored by the Elliott School of International Affairs

Wednesday, April 6, 2011
9:00 AM - 5:15 PM

School of Media and Public Affairs,
Jack Morton Auditorium
805 21st Street, NW

The International Space Station and Mars Conference (ISSMars-DC)


This two-day conference will focus on the potential applications of the International Space Station for exploration of Mars.

For more information please visit spi@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Explore Mars, Inc. and the Space Policy Institute

Wednesday, April 6, 2011
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Sino-Russian Relations in the Northeast Asian Regional Context


Gilbert Rozman, Musgrave Professor of Sociology, Princeton University; Fellow, Woodrow Wilson Center

Gilbert Rozman will assess Sino-Russian relations in triangular contexts. He will consider the Korean peninsula, Japan, and regionalism in Asia as well as examine Central Asia and South and Southeast Asia. Stress will be placed on Chinese reasoning and how Russia is responding.
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Gil Rozman is the Musgrave Professor of Sociology at Princeton University and a Woodrow Wilson International Center Fellow. He specializes on China, Japan, Korea, and Russia, and has recently concentrated on comparing national identities. In addition, he works on sociological factors in international relations, emphasizing mutual perceptions and barriers to regionalism. He received his Ph.D. from Princeton University in Sociology and has been on the faculty there for 40 years. His recent publications include: <i>Chinese Strategic Thought toward Asia, U.S. Leadership, History and Bilateral Relations in Northeast Asia</i>, and <i>East Asian National Identities: Commonalities and Differences</i>.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/RozmanApr6

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies, the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, and the Asia Society

Wednesday, April 6, 2011
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

The New Faces of VOA


Dan Austin, Director, Voice of America

Frank Sesno, Director, School of Media and Public Affairs

Join the Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication and the Walter Roberts Endowment Board as the director of Voice of America (VOA), Dan Austin, relates his perspective on the changing face of public diplomacy.

A reception will follow the event.

Please RSVP at: http://ipdgcvoa.eventbrite.com/

Sponsored by the Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication, the Walter Roberts Endowment Board, and the School of Media and Public Affairs

Thursday, April 7, 2011
12:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Human Rights, Development, and Growth: Metrics, New Strategies, and New Ways of Thinking


12:30-1:00 PM: Lunch

1:00-1:15 PM: Opening Remarks and Overview
Stephen Smith, Director, Institute for International Economic Policy, GW

Susan Ariel Aaronson, Associate Research Professor, GW

1:15-2:35 PM: Panel 1 - Multidimensional Poverty Measurement: Uses for a New Understanding of the Meaning of Poverty and Deprivation

Jeni Klugman, Director, Human Development Report Office, UNDP - "UNDP's Multidimensional Poverty Metric"

Shabana Singh, Vanderbilt University - "Towards a Multinational Measure of Governance"

Ricardo Aparicio, Director, Policy Analysis, Coneval, Mexico - "Multidimensional Poverty Measurement: a Human Rights Based Approach - The case of Mexico"

Discussant:
Ambar Narayan, Senior Economist, Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Network, World Bank

2:35-3:45 PM: Panel 2 - Measuring Inequality of Opportunities Among Children: the Human Opportunity Index

Jaime Saavedra, Director, Poverty Reduction and Equity, World Bank

Javier Escobal, Senior Researcher, GRADE Peru

Discussant:
Dena Ringold, Senior Economist, Human Development Network, World Bank

3:45-4:00 PM: Coffee Break

4:00-5:30 PM: Panel 3 - New Metrics for Assessing Human Rights and How These Metrics Relate to Development and Governance

David Cingranelli, Professor of Political Science, SUNY - "CIRI Human Rights Data Set"

Sabine Donner, Bertlesmann Foundation, Transformation Index

Nathaniel Heller, Global Integrity Index

Moderator:
Siobhan McInerny, Nordic Trust Fund, World Bank

5:50-6:00 PM: Coffee Break (Please note change of Conference Location to Harry Harding Auditorium, 2nd Floor)

6:00-7:00 PM: Evening Keynote (in the Harry Harding Auditorium - Room 213)

Dani Kaufmann, Senior Fellow, Brookings Institute

Albert Einstein once noted that not everything that counts can be counted. Yet to evaluate the effects of policies and strategies, activists, policymakers, and scholars need to be able to measure change in human rights and development over time. This two-day conference is organized by the Institute for International Economic Policy of the Elliott School of International Affairs, GW.  We will examine new human rights and development metrics from a wide range of sources including the UNDP; the Bertelsmann Foundation; CIRI (SUNY Binghamton); Global Integrity; the World Bank; and others.  In addition, we will focus on how scholars, business leaders, development activists, and policy makers are using these tools.  Finally, we will debate how to improve these metrics and make them both more accurate and useful.

Please RSVP at: http://tiny.cc/HumanRightsMetrics

Sponsored by the Institute for International Economic Policy, Institute for Global and International Studies, GW Center for International Business Education & Research, Bertlesmann Foundation, World Bank Poverty Reduction and Equity Management Network

Thursday, April 7, 2011
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

Layers of Discrimination against Roma in Europe


Stanislav Daniel, Research and Advocacy Officer, The European Roma Rights Centre, Hungary

Discussant:
Michelle Kelso, Assistant Professor of Human Services and Sociology, GW

Stanislav Daniel will present stories illustrating the multiple forms of discrimination against Roma in today's Europe. The talk will focus on the tendency of European governments to tackle social exclusion from the perspective of poverty, without taking into account how ethnicity factors into the poor living conditions of Europe's least tolerated minority.
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Stanislav Daniel is a Research Officer at the European Roma Rights Centre (ERRC) in Budapest, Hungary, focusing on the Czech Republic, Russia and Slovakia. Previously he worked on a study for the European Commission on the impact of policies, programs and projects aimed at Roma inclusion in 18 countries of the European Union. Before joining the ERRC as a staff member, he worked for the ERRC as a consultant and was extensively involved in an ERRC/Roma Education Fund assessment of government law and policy on the educational integration of Romani children in the Czech Republic, ERRC research on the implementation of government policies concerning Roma in Italy, and an ERRC/UNICEF study of children's rights in Moldova. He has also participated in research projects on behalf of Slovak and international NGOs and foundations, mainly focusing on the impact of government policy and programming on the living conditions of Roma, with special attention to education, housing and health care. He was one of the authors of the Slovakia section of the 2008 Open Society Institute assessment "Equal Access to Quality Education for Roma Children."
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Michelle Kelso holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Michigan and previously worked at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Her research interests include the Roma in Romania and their experience during the Holocaust.

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Thursday, April 7, 2011
6:00 PM - 7:15 PM

Estelle and Melvin Gelman Library, Second Floor
2130 H Street, NW

The Edge of War: Kuwait's Underground Resistance Movement


Ambassador Edward "Skip" Gnehm, Kuwait Professor of Gulf and Arabian Peninsula Affairs, GW; former U.S. Ambassador to Kuwait, Australia, and Jordan

Ambassador Salem al-Sabah, Ambassador of Kuwait to the United States

Dr. Farida al-Habib, Cardiologist; former Resistance Member

General Brent Scowcroft, former National Security Advisor to President George H. W. Bush

Ambassador Salem al-Sabah, Kuwaiti Ambassador to the United States, and Dr. Farida al-Habib, a cardiologist and former resistance member, will introduce a new book soon to hit American and Kuwaiti shelves. <i>The Edge of War: Kuwait's Underground Resistance</i> is a history set during the Iraqi occupation of Kuwait in the early 1990s. The book explores the actions of the Khafji group, an unofficial but well-organized group of Kuwaitis who waged a campaign against Iraq during the seven months of Kuwait's occupation. Although small, the resistance was instrumental in smuggling key materials across the border - bringing medical supplies, communications equipment and arms into Kuwait, and bringing information and people out. The book concludes with the Battle of Khafji, one of the most important battles of the Gulf War.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/EdgeOfWarKuwait

Sponsored by Middle East Policy Forum and the Institute for Middle East Studies

Thursday, April 7, 2011
6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

U.S. Relations with Major and Rising Powers: China, India, and Russia


David Shambaugh, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs; Director, China Policy Program, GW

Deepa Ollapally, Associate Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, GW; Director, India Initiative

Henry E. Hale, Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs; Director, Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, GW

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/4z3bvnq

Sponsored by the Elliott School of International Affairs

Friday, April 8, 2011
8:00 AM - 5:30 PM

Media and Public Affairs building, Room B07
805 21st Street, NW

Human Rights, Development, and Growth: Metrics, New Strategies, and New Ways of Thinking


8:00-9:00 AM: Continental Breakfast

9:00-10:00 AM: Panel 4 - Caveats on Metrics

James Foster, Professor of Economics and International Affairs, GW - "An Economist's Caveats"

Hans Sano, Nordic Trust Fund, World Bank - "A Human Rights and Economic Historian"

Elizabeth Eagen, Program Officer, Human Rights Data Initiative, Open Society Foundations

Moderator:
Charles Kenny, Center for Global Development

10:00-11:30 AM: Panel 5 - Using Datasets to Examine Human Rights and Economic Change

Robert Blanton, Professor of Political Science, University of Memphis - "Human Rights and Foreign Investment"

Rod Abouharb, University College, London - "Can the WTO Help Nations Clean Up and Improve Human Rights?"

Jean-Pierre Chauffour, World Bank, Trade Group - "On the Relevance of Positive and Negative Rights in Economic Development - New empirical evidence (1975-2007)"

Clair Apodaca, Associate Professor of International Relations, Florida International University - "Human Rights Violations in an Era of Scarcity"

Daniel Meija, Associate Professor of Economics, Universidad de los Andes, Colombia

Moderator:
Emmanuel Teitelbaum, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, GW

12:00-1:30 PM: Lunch and Lunch Keynote

Introduction:
Annette Heuser, Bertlesmann Foundation

Keynote Presenter:
Donna Edwards (D-MD), Lantos Human Rights Commission, U.S. Congress

1:30-3:00 PM: Panel 6 - NGO and Business Perspectives on Metrics to Assess Human Rights

Bennett Freeman, Senior Vice President, Sustainability and Research and Policy, Calvert Investments

Chris Jochnick, Director, Private Sector Department, Oxfam America

Faris Natour, Director of Human Rights, BSR

Olav Ljosne, Senior Manager for Communications, International Operations, Shell Oil Company

Sherilyn Brodersen, Kraft Foods

Moderator:
Hans J. Hogrefe, Former Dem. Staff Director, House Human Rights Commission

3:00-3:15 PM: Coffee Break

3:15-4:45 PM: Panel 7 - New Governmental Strategies That Use Metrics and Link Economic Growth and Human Rights

Gerard Pachoud, Special Advisor, UN Special Representative on Business and Human Rights - "Ruggie Guidelines and Use of Metrics to Assess Business Human Rights Performance"

Ginny Bauman, Director of Partnerships, Free the Slaves

Jane Sigmon, Senior Coordinator, International Programs, Trafficking in Persons Office, U.S. Department of State - "Metrics to Assess Progress in Reducing Trafficking"

Raymond Gilpin, United States Institute of Peace - "Measuring Progress with Reconstruction and Human Rights in Conflict Environments: A Metrics Framework"

Mike Dzniec, United States Institute of Peace - "Measuring Progress with Reconstruction and Human Rights in Conflict Environments: A Metrics Framework"

Raymond Gilpin, Associate Vice President, Sustainable Economies Centers of Innovation, United States Institute of Peace - "Reconstruction and Development Metrics in Post-Conflict Environments"

Tom Kelly, Millenium Challenge Corporation, U.S. Government

Moderator:
Susan Aaronson, Associate Research Professor of International Affairs, GW

4:30-5:30 PM: So, What do you think? Are these metrics useful? Can they be improved?

Moderator:
Susan Aaronson, Associate Research Professor of International Affairs, GW

Albert Einstein once noted that not everything that counts can be counted. Yet to evaluate the effects of policies and strategies, activists, policymakers, and scholars need to be able to measure change in human rights and development over time. This two-day conference is organized by the Institute for International Economic Policy of the Elliott School of International Affairs, GW.  We will examine new human rights and development metrics from a wide range of sources including the UNDP; the Bertelsmann Foundation; CIRI (SUNY Binghamton); Global Integrity; the World Bank; and others.  In addition, we will focus on how scholars, business leaders, development activists, and policy makers are using these tools.  Finally, we will debate how to improve these metrics and make them both more accurate and useful.

Please RSVP at: http://tiny.cc/HumanRightsMetrics

Sponsored by the Institute for International Economic Policy, Institute for Global and International Studies, GW Center for International Business Education & Research, Bertlesmann Foundation, World Bank Poverty Reduction and Equity Management Network

Friday, April 8, 2011
6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Lisner Auditorium
730 21st Street, NW

GZ|DC 2Ø11 Kick-off


Ellen Tauscher, Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security, U.S. Department of State

Rose Gottemoeller, Assistant Secretary of State for the Bureau of Arms Control, Verification and Compliance, U.S. Department of State; Chief Negotiator of the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty

Bruce Blair, President, World Security Institute

Learn more about the Global Zero DC 2Ø11 Conference at: <a href="http://www.globalzero.org/gzdc2011/schedule">http://www.globalzero.org/gzdc2011/schedule</a>

Please RSVP at: http://bit.ly/eewvk4

Sponsored by Global Zero, the Institute for Security and Conflict Studies, and the Nuclear Policy Talks

Monday, April 11, 2011
6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Sigur Center The Chung-wen Shih Conference Room, Suite 503
1957 E Street, NW

OAS Film Series: The 10 Conditions of Love


The <i>10 Conditions of Love</i> is the story of Rebiya Kadeer, China's nightmare, the woman it accuses of inciting terrorism. It is also the story of the other Tibet, the Muslim Tibet, the country its people call East Turkestan, but which the Chinese call Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.
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It is a big story: a story of the ruthless oppression of millions of people; of the geopolitics of energy; of Super Power politicking over the War on Terror; and of the pain of a deeply loving family torn violently apart. Exiled in the US, Rebiya Kadeer is fighting for the human rights of her people, the Uyghur (pron. wee-ger), China's oppressed Muslim Turkish minority. But Rebiya Kadeer's campaign condemns her sons to on-going solitary confinement in a Chinese prison. Having done six years of solitary confinement herself, she understands the appalling consequences for them of her actions, but she will not relent. Twice nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize and once the richest business person in China, Rebiya Kadeer is a remarkable woman who pays daily a terrible price for patriotism.

Pizza and soda will be provided.

Please RSVP at: http://bit.ly/dVZyHr

Sponsored by the Organization for Asian Studies and the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Tuesday, April 12, 2011
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Michael Yahuda Book Release: The International Politics of the Asia Pacific


Michael Yahuda, Professor Emeritus, London School of Economics; Visiting Scholar, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, GW

Michael Yahuda is Professor Emeritus at the London School of Economics (LSE) and Visiting Scholar at the Sigur Center for Asian Studies. Having taught at the LSE for thirty years, Michael Yahuda retired in 2003. He has been a visiting professor at universities in Australia, the U.S., Singapore, and most recently in China, where he taught a course on Chinese foreign policy. He enjoys an international reputation as a specialist on the international politics of the Asia-Pacific and on China's foreign relations. He has contributed to the international media in several countries and is the author and editor of 8 books and over 200 scholarly articles and chapters in edited books.
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This fully revised third edition of Michael Yahuda's extremely successful textbook brings the region fully up-to-date, introducing students to the international politics of the Asia-Pacific region since 1945. As well as assessing the post-Cold War uncertainties that challenged the balance and power within the region, Yahuda also examines the first decade of the new millennium which includes no let up on the 'war on terror', new political administrations in all the key player-states and increased cooperative security between some nations, polarised by volatile relationships between others.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/YahudaApr12

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Tuesday, April 12, 2011
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Monroe Hall, Kendrick Conference Room, Room 321
2115 G Street, NW

A Control Function Approach to Estimating Dynamic Probit Models with Endogenous Regressors, with an Application to the Study of Poverty Persistence in China


Irina Murtazashvili, Professor of Economics, University of Pittsburgh

This event is part of the Institute for International Economic Policy's Trade and Development Workshop Series.

RSVP: iiep@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Department of Economics and the Institute for International Economic Policy

Tuesday, April 12, 2011
6:45 PM - 8:00 PM

Marvin Center Ballroom, 3rd Floor
1957 E Street, NW

China Rises


Bruce Dickson, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, GW

Derek Scissors, Research Fellow for Asia Economic Policy, The Heritage Foundation; Adjunct Professor, GW

Michael Yahuda, Professor Emeritus the London School of Economics; Visiting Scholar at the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Robert Shepherd, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Honors and International Affairs, GW

Please join us for a discussion of China's increasing international influence and its political, economic, and cultural impacts on East Asia. We will be hosting four esteemed experts in different areas of China studies.

Please RSVP at: http://bit.ly/fugXNO

Sponsored by the Sigma Psi Zeta Sorority, the Global China Connection, and the Organization of Asian Studies

Tuesday, April 12, 2011
7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Room 402-404,
Marvin Center
800 21st Street

Sigma Iota Rho International Affairs Honors Society Information Session


Come learn about Sigma Iota Rho, the Elliott School of International Affairs Honors Society. The information session will introduce our fall recruitment process and the academic, professional and social benefits of joining one of the nation's top honors societies. You will get a chance to meet the current chapter members and learn about some of the public events that are being planned for the spring and fall semesters.

Refreshments will be provided.

This event is open to all students majoring or minoring in International Affairs.

RSVP: ksager@gwmail.gwu.edu

Wednesday, April 13, 2011
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

The Chung-wen Shih Conference Room, Room 503
1957 E Street, NW

Conversations with Scholars: Xinjiang or East Turkestan? Thoughts on the Uyghur Homeland with Sean Roberts, Alim Seytoff, and Nury Turkel


Sean Roberts, Associate Professor of the Practice of International Affairs; Director, International Development Studies Program, GW

Alim Seytoff, President, Uyghur American Association; Director, Uyghur Human Rights Project

Nury Turkel, Uyghur-American lawyer and activist; Co-founder, Uyghur Human Rights Project; Former President of the Uyghur American Association

Professor Sean Roberts is a sociocultural anthropologist, the director of the International Development Studies Program and associate professor of international development and international affairs at The George Washington University. Having conducted ethnographic fieldwork among the Uyghur people of Central Asia and China during the 1990s, he produced a documentary film on the community entitled <i>Waiting for Uighurstan</i>(1996). He also has published extensively on this community in scholarly journals and in collected volumes, including "A 'Land of Borderlands': Implications of Xinjiang's Trans-border Interactions" in <i>Xinjiang: China's Muslim Borderland</i> (ME Sharpe, 2004) and "Imagining Uyghurstan: re-evaluating the birth of the modern Uyghur nation" (<i>Central Asian Survey</i>, 2009).  He holds a B.A. in history and Russian from Bowdoin College and a Ph.D. in cultural anthropology from University of Southern California.
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Mr. Alim Seytoff is the president of the Uyghur American Association, the director of the Uyghur Human Rights Project, and special assistant to the President of the World Uyghur Congress, Ms. Rebiya Kadeer. He frequently appears in the media and his articles on the Uyghurs have appeared in the <i>Wall Street Journal, Asia Times</i>, and <i>The Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst</i> (a publication of Johns Hopkins University). Mr. Seytoff holds a B.A. in Chinese Studies from Xinjiang University, a B.A. in Broadcast Journalism from Southern Adventist University, an M.A. in Political Science from the Robertson School of Government at Regent University, a Certificate of Graduate Studies in International Politics from Regent University, and a J.D. from Regent University.
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Mr. Nury Turkel is a Uyghur-American lawyer and activist, the co-founder of the Uyghur Human Rights Project and former president of the Uyghur American Association.  He writes and speaks frequently to advocate for Uyghur human rights. He holds a B.S. in Environmental Studies from Northwest A&F University in Xianyang, Shaanxi, China, an M.A. in International Affairs from American University, and a J.D. degree from American University.

Lunch will be provided.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/uyghurhomeland

Sponsored by the Organization for Asian Studies and the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Wednesday, April 13, 2011
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Weapons of the Wealthy: Predatory Regimes and Elite-Led Protests in Central Asia


Scott Radnitz, Assistant Professor of International Studies, University of Washington

Commentary by:
David Abramson, Analyst, Bureau of Intelligence and Research, U.S. Department of State

Please join us for a discussion of <i>Weapons of the Wealthy: Predatory Regimes and Elite-Led Protests in Central Asia</i> with presentation by author Scott Radnitz and commentary by David Abramson.
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Mass mobilization is among the most dramatic and inspiring forces for political change. Investigation into how protests are organized, however, can sometimes reveal that the origins and purpose of people power are not as they appear on the surface. Protest can be used as an instrument of elite actors to advance their own interests rather than those of the masses. Weapons of the Wealthy investigates the causes of elite-led protest in Central Asia. Scott Radnitz demonstrates the elite bases for mobilization in Kyrgyzstan's post-independence development, while explaining the absence of similar mobilization in Uzbekistan.

RSVP: novikova@gwu.edu

Sponsored by International Program of the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, Program on New Approaches to Research and Security in Eurasia (PONARS Eurasia)

Wednesday, April 13, 2011
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

America, Oil, and War in the Middle East


Toby Jones, Assistant Professor of Middle East History, Rutgers University

Launched just a little over two years after the September 11th terrorist attacks, the American invasion of Iraq in 2003 seemed to be a response to then pressing strategic and security concerns. Proponents of the push to topple Saddam Hussein's regime offered a number of justifications for urgent action, citing Iraq's likely possession and imminent use of weapons of mass destruction, the regime's complicity in the events of 9/11, and an increasingly bold pattern of roguish behavior that flaunted international law, and more importantly, American security. Although many of the reasons proffered for war would ultimately prove flimsy, even contrived, making sense of the big picture has remained a challenge. To do this, and to consider how the 2003 invasion was connected to and the outcome of a longer pattern of American policymaking in the Persian Gulf, it is necessary to consider the various ways that the United States has been engaged in either direct military action or policies that have facilitated perpetual warfare in the Middle East since the late 1970s. Oil has been central to this pattern. Although Middle Eastern oil has been tied directly to American national security since World War II, the conflation of oil and national security with war took shape in the last three decades of the 20th century. From direct military intervention, to the militarization of oil through the sale of billions of dollars of weapons to petro-states in the region, to the propping up of barely stable oil regimes, American policy has abetted war more than it has prevented it.

Please RSVP at: http://bit.ly/hnZdua

This event is part of the Institute for the Middle East Studies' Lecture Series. This series is supported by the U.S. Department of Education Title VI Grant for National Resource Centers.

Sponsored by the Institute for Middle East Studies

Wednesday, April 13, 2011
7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Room 213
1957 E Street, NW

An Evening with the Swiss Ambassador to the United States


Ambassador Manuel Sager, Ambassador of Switzerland to the United States

Delta Phi Epsilon Professional Foreign Service Sorority welcomes the Honorable Manuel Sager, the Swiss Ambassador to the United States, for a discussion on US-Swiss relations.

A reception will follow the event. Please RSVP at: http://tiny.cc/swissamb

Sponsored by the Delta Phi Epsilon Professional Foreign Service Sorority

Thursday, April 14, 2011
10:00 AM - 1:00 PM

City View Room, 7th Floor
1957 E Street, NW

Implementing the Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review Recommendations on Gender in Development: A Roundtable Discussion


Annual James P. Grant Lecture: "Gender, Diplomacy, and Development"
Ambassador Melanne Verveer, Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women's Issues

Roundtable speakers:
Ritu Sharma, President and Co-Founder, Women Thrive Worldwide

Leigh Carter, Executive Director, Fonkoze USA

Caren Grown, Senior Gender Advisor, USAID

Nilufar Ahmad, Senior Gender Specialist, the World Bank

Winnie Tay, Director of Program Management, Plan International USA

Anju Malhotra, Vice President for Research, Innovation, and Impact, International Center for Research on Women

This roundtable discussion (from 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM) will look at examples of how a gender perspective has been implemented in different areas, such as infrastructure, education, health, fragile states, and economic empowerment. This discussion will include panelists from a range of governmental and non-governmental organizations.
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The James P. Grant lecture by Ambassador Melanne Verveer (from 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM) will address the importance of a gender perspective in achieving the Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review goals, including health.

Please RSVP at: http://bit.ly/gXdERt

Sponsored by the Global Gender Initiative, Institute for Global and International Studies, and the Collaborating Centers

Thursday, April 14, 2011
12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Identity and Rising Asian Powers: Implications for Regional Cooperation


Allen Carlson, Associate Professor of Government, Cornell University

Mike Mochizuki, Associate Dean for Academic Programs; Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, GW

Deepa Ollapally, Associate Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, GW

Moderator:
Shawn McHale, Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, GW

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/PolicyBriefingApril14

This event is part of the Sigur Center's Rising Powers Initiative

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Thursday, April 14, 2011
3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

The State of Social Science Research and Free Inquiry in the Western Eurasia Borderlands


Olga Breskaya, Assistant Professor, Brest State University, Belarus and European Humanities University, Lithuania

Milana Nikolko, Director, Institute for Social Anthropology, Ukraine

Alexandr Osipian, Associate Professor of History, Kramatorsk Institute of Economics and Humanities, Ukraine

Pavel Tereshkovich, Associate Professor of Sociology, European Humanities University; Director, Center for Advanced Study and Education for the Western Eurasia Borderlands

Elena Matusevich, Lecturer, European Humanities University; Guest Lecturer, Humboldt State University

This event is part of the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies' Petrach Program on Ukraine

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Thursday, April 14, 2011
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

Germany Says "No"-Again


Dieter Dettke, Georgetown University

Germany's abstention on the UN Security Council's vote to establish a 'no-fly zone' over Libya and to authorize all necessary measures to protect civilians raises serious questions about the future direction of the country's foreign policy. Whereas Germany's 'No' to the war in Iraq appears to have been justified, the decision in the case of Libya is a de facto 'No' to the principle of the responsibility to protect. As a result, German foreign policy seems to have lost its moral and political compass and risks drifting into uncertainty.
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Dr. Dieter Dettke is a foreign and security policy specialist, author and editor of numerous publications on German, European, and US foreign and security issues. He studied Law and Political Science in Bonn, Berlin, and Strasbourg, and was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Washington in Seattle in 1967-68. He served as Foreign Policy and Security Policy Advisor of the SPD Parliamentary Group of the German Bundestag from 1974-84 and as the US Representative and Executive Director of the Friedrich Ebert Foundation in Washington from 1985 until 2006, managing a comprehensive program of transatlantic cooperation. His book, Germany Says 'No': The Iraq War and the Future of German Foreign and Security Policy, was published by Woodrow Wilson Center Press and The Johns Hopkins University Press in 2009.

Please send an RSVP with your name and affiliation to: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Graduate Program in European and Eurasian Studies and the Institute for Eurpean, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Friday, April 15, 2011
9:30 AM - 11:00 AM

Room 505
1957 E Street, NW

Standards & Regulations for the Geologic Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Waste


Rodney C. Ewing, Edward H. Kraus Distinguished University Professor, University of Michigan; Visiting Professor, Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC), Stanford University

Professor Ewing will discuss his recommendations for changes to the regulatory approach to the nuclear fuel cycle. The talk will be based on a white paper he was asked as to prepare for the Blue Ribbon Commission on Americas Nuclear Future.
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This paper draws on Professor Ewing's experience as a reviewer of the scientific programs and performance assessments of the geological repository for transuranic waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico and the proposed repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. In addition, he served on numerous committees of the National Research Council that have addressed many aspects of nuclear waste management. These comments and recommendations focus on standards and regulations for licensing a geological repository for SNF and HLW.

A light breakfast will be available starting at 9am.

Please RSVP at: http://bit.ly/REwing

Sponsored by Deparment of Chemistry, the Nuclear Policy Talks, and the Institute for Security and Conflict Studies

Friday, April 15, 2011
10:30 AM - 7:00 PM

Harry Harding Auditorium, Room 213
1957 E Street, NW

Admitted Graduate Student Open House


A day-long program including academic program presentations, faculty lectures, panels, and reception.

This event is open to admitted graduate students only.

Please register at: http://bit.ly/hTNyTc

Sponsored by Office of Graduate Admissions

Friday, April 15, 2011
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

Conservative Political Parties and the Challenge of Democratization: Lessons from Europe's Historical Experience


Daniel Ziblatt, Professor of Government, Harvard University

Professor Ziblatt is the author of <i>Structuring the State: The Formation of Italy, Germany, and the Puzzle of Federalism</i> (Princeton University Press, 2006), which was awarded several prizes including the American Political Science Association's 2007 award for Best Book in European Politics. He is co-editor of a 2010 special double issue of <i>Comparative Political Studies</i> entitled "The Historical Turn in Democratization Studies" and is currently writing a book, <i>Conservative Political Parties and the Birth of Modern Democracy in Europe, 1848-1950</i>, that offers a new interpretation of the historical democratization of Europe. His recent papers have received APSA's Luebbert Prize (2009) for best published comparative politics paper, APSA's Sage Prize (2008) for best comparative paper presented, and two article prizes from the Comparative Democratization Section of APSA (2010). Ziblatt has been visiting professor and fellow at the École Normal Supérieure (Paris, France), the Max Planck Institute (Cologne, Germany), and the University of Konstanz (Germany).

This event is part of the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies' European Politics Series

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Monday, April 18, 2011
12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Toward a New Architecture for Politico-Military Security in Europe: The Role of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe


Petros Efthymiou, President, Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe Parliamentary Assembly; MP, Hellenic Parliament

Petros Efthymiou was born in Larisa in 1950 and graduated from the Philosophical School of the University of Ioannina. He taught in secondary education and at the Panteion University and worked as a journalist for major Greek newspapers, the radio and TV. A member of the Hellenic Parliament since 2004, he began his political activity in the early 1970s, participating in the resistance against the Greek dictatorship (1967-1974). His experience in governmental posts ranges from serving as Special Advisor for Educational Issues at the Ministry of Youth and Sports (1982-1985) and General Secretary of Media and Information at the Ministry of Press and Media (1985) to his office as Minister of Education and Religious Affairs (2000-2004). His international background includes a term as Member of the European Parliament (1999-2000), in the course of which he served on the Committee of Foreign Affairs, Human Rights, Common Security and Defense Policy. A Member of the Hellenic Delegation to the Parliamentary Assembly of the OSCE since 2004, he served consecutively as a Member, Vice-Chairman and Chairman of the 2nd General Committee on Economic Affairs, Science, Technology and Environment of the OSCE, as well as Vice-President of the P.A. In the summer of 2010 he was elected President of the Parliamentary Assembly.

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies and The Hellenic Society of Washington, D.C.

Monday, April 18, 2011
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Sigur Center Chung-wen Shih Conference Room, Suite 503
1957 E Street, NW

Asian Film Series: Kekexili (Mountain Patrol)


<i>Kekexili </i>(Mountain Patrol) depicts the true story of volunteers who fought to protect endangered antelope against poachers in the remote Tibetan region of Kekexili. Most of the cast are Tibetan amateur actors. In 2004, <i>Kekexili</i> won Best Picture at Taiwan's Golden Horse Film Festival and the special Jury Prize at the Tokyo International Film Festival. This film had a significant impact in China by bringing attention to Kekexili and the plight of its inhabitants and endangered species.
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The film will be shown in Tibetan and Mandarin with English subtitles.

Please RSVP at: http://bit.ly/g3iGGE

Sponsored by Machik, the Organization of Asian Studies, and the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Tuesday, April 19, 2011
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

The Global Economic Crisis: A View from Montenegro


Milorad Katnic, Minister of Finance, Montenegro

The global economic crisis that began in 2008 continues to roil international politics and markets. Montenegro's Finance Minister will provide a policy-maker's perspective on how his country is addressing the situation. Additionally, he will analyze the implications for Europe and the U.S.
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Milorad Katnic has served as Montenegro's Finance Minister since 2010. From 2004 until 2010, he served as Deputy Minister and took part in the implementation of the most significant structural reforms of the Montenegrin economy, including in the financial, fiscal and pension sectors. He serves as a head of the Working Group and Negotiating Team on Montenegro's accession to the European Union (in charge of economic and financial Issues and statistics) and is a coordinator of the Negotiating Team on Montenegro's accession to the World Trade Organization (in charge of the financial services area). He recently defended his doctoral dissertation on the topic "Public Consumption and Economic Growth."

A light lunch will be served beginning at 11:45 AM.

Part of Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasians Studies' Eurasian Leadership Series.

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, the Institute for International Economic Policy, and the Embassy of Montenegro

Tuesday, April 19, 2011
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Monroe Hall, Kendrick Conference Room, Room 321
2115 G Street, NW

Managers' Mobility, Trade Status, and Wages


Luca David Opromolla, Research Economist, Economic Research Department, Banco de Portugal

This event is part of the Institute for International Economic Policy's Trade and Development Workshop Series.

RSVP: iiep@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Department of Economics and the Institute for International Economic Policy

Tuesday, April 19, 2011
12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Transnational Advocacy Networks and Combating Human Trafficking in Southeast Asia


Andrea Bertone, Visiting Assistant Professor of International Affairs, GW

Advocacy networks against human trafficking in Southeast Asia formed long before the movement to combat trafficking in the U.S. gained ascendancy. This talk will illuminate some of those progressive movements in Asia and identify what we in the west can learn from them.
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Andrea M. Bertone, Ph.D. has been working on issues of gender equity, child protection, and human rights and human trafficking since the mid 1990s. Professor Bertone is the director of <a href="http://humantrafficking.org">http://humantrafficking.org</a>, the first comprehensive, publicly available, Internet-based information resource on human trafficking in Asia and the United States and selected global hotspots. Most recently, she has been managing a portfolio of girls' education projects at the Academy for Educational Development in five countries of sub-Saharan Africa. Her academic research has focused on transnational advocacy networks in Southeast Asia to combat human trafficking. She currently has a teaching appointment at the George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs. Bertone received her Ph.D. from the University of Maryland, College Park. She has published several book chapters and articles in peer reviewed journals.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/BertoneApr19

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies and the Asia Society

Tuesday, April 19, 2011
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

Permafrost, Society and Climate Change: Implications for the Russian Arctic


Nikolay I. Shiklomanov, Assistant Professor of Geography, GW

Many of the potential environmental and socio-economic impacts of global warming in the high northern latitudes are associated with permafrost, or perennially frozen ground, which occupy more than 50% of the land area of Russia. The approximately 5% of the population living in the Russian Arctic regions provide about 11% of the country's GDP mainly due to extraction of mineral resources. In Russia, 93% of natural gas and 75% of oil are produced in permafrost-affected areas. Overall, Russian permafrost regions contribute up to 70% of Russia's total exports. Major permafrost-related impacts of climate change have already been detected in many Russian regions. These include changes in the properties and distribution of permafrost. Such changes in natural systems affect the human environment and have direct and immediate implications for land use, the economy, and human life. They also threaten the normal functioning of communities and economic development. This presentation addresses the effects of climate change on Russian permafrost regions and their implications for socio-economic development. It also provides an overview of permafrost-related research conducted in GW's Department of Geography.
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Dr. Nikolay Shiklomanov is assistant professor of Geography at GW. His main area of research is the response of the Arctic environment to climatic variability and change. He is also interested in Geomorphology, the history of Arctic research, and socio-economic problems associated with development in Arctic regions. Dr. Shiklomanov's NSF- and NASA-sponsored projects include both field-based investigations in northern Alaska, Siberia, Mongolia, and China and simulation studies at regional and circumarctic scales. He has authored or co-authored 39 peer reviewed publications and has contributed to several books and reports, including IPCC and Arctic Climate Impact Assessments. A native of St. Petersburg, Russia, Dr. Shiklomanov maintains close personal and professional ties with his home country. In the course of his research he has developed productive relationships with scientists from a wide range of Russian research and educational institutions. Dr. Shiklomanov actively involves students at both the graduate and undergraduate levels in his research, including summer field work in the remote areas of the Arctic. He teaches a range of Physical Geography courses.

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Wednesday, April 20, 2011
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Sigur Center The Chung-wen Shih Conference Room, Suite 503
1957 E Street, NW

The Rise of India and China: A Comparative Perspective


Deepa Ollapally, Associate Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, GW

This event is an informal luncheon and Q&A session with Dr. Ollapally.
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Deepa Ollapally is the Associate Director of the Sigur Center for Asian Studies at the Elliott School. Previously, she directed the South Asia program at the U.S. Institute of Peace, and was associate professor of political science at Swarthmore College. Prior to that, Dr. Ollapally was fellow and head of the international and strategic studies unit at the National Institute of Advanced Studies in Bangalore, India. She is on the executive board of Women in International Security, Washington, DC; and on the advisory council of Women in Security, Conflict Management and Peace in New Delhi. She is the author of Confronting Conflict: Domestic Factors and U.S. Policymaking in the Third World, as well as numerous journal articles. Her areas of research and teaching are: South Asian regional security; comparative politics of South Asia; nuclear nonproliferation; terrorism; gender and international security. She holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Columbia University.

The event is limited to the first 20 OAS members and GW students who RSVP.

Lunch will be provided.

Please RSVP at: http://bit.ly/g5xvQO

Sponsored by the Organization for Asian Studies (OAS) and the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Wednesday, April 20, 2011
5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

T&I Seminar: Judging Edward Teller


István Hargittai, Physical Chemist; Research Professor, Budapest University of Technology and Economics

The talk will be about the former GW physics professor, Edward Teller, a most controversial figure who continues being divisive in the community of scientists. To his supporters he was a hero of the Cold War. To his detractors he was evil personified. Between these extremes was the life of the real man. It is this real man that the presentation will be about, based on the author's new book, <i>Judging Edward Teller: A Closer Look at One of the Most Influential Scientists of the Twentieth Century</i> (Prometheus, Amherst, NY, 2010). The talk will be a non-technical discussion for a broad multi-disciplinary audience.

RSVP: cistp@email.gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Department of Physics and the Center for International Science and Technology Policy

Thursday, April 21, 2011
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Conference
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Reception and Book Signing
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Keynote
5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

City View Room, 7th Floor
1957 E Street, NW

Institute for Middle East Studies Annual Conference: Iran in Transition


Keynote Speaker
Shirin Ebadi, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate; Human Rights Lawyer

Conference Panelists
Kaveh Ehsani, Assistant Professor of International Studies, DePaul University

Nader Hashemi, Assistant Professor of International Studies, University of Denver

Elliot Hen-Tov, Princeton University

Arang Keshavarzian, Associate Professor of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies; Director of Undergraduate Studies, New York University

Azam Khatam, York University

Pardis Minuchehr, Lecturer, University of Pennsylvania

Misagh Parsa, Professor of Sociology, Dartmouth College

Djavad Salehi-Isfahani, Professor of Economic, Virginia Tech; Non-Resident Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution

Naghmeh Sohrabi, Lecturer in History, Brandeis University

Mohammad Ayatollahi Tabaar, Visiting Scholar, Institute for Middle East Studies, GW

Roxanne Varzi, Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Irvine

Leading academics go deep inside the politics, economy, culture, and society of a rapidly evolving Iran.

Please RSVP by April 10th:
Conference: http://bit.ly/fqPoFM
Keynote: http://bit.ly/gYMYzA

For photos from this event, please visit: http://flic.kr/s/aHsjupB8hx

Sponsored by the Elliott School of International Affairs, the Institute for Middle East Studies, the Project on Middle East Political Science (POEMPS), and the Middle East Policy Forum

Thursday, April 21, 2011
11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Ambassadors Forum: A Conversation with EU Ambassador to the U.S. João Vale de Almeida


Ambassador João Vale de Almeida, Head of the Delegation of the European Union to the United States

Ambassador João Vale de Almeida is the Head of the Delegation of the European Union to the United States. In this capacity, he represents European Commission President José Manuel Barroso and President of the European Council Herman Van Rompuy, under the authority of the High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Catherine Ashton.
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Prior to his appointment in Washington, he served as the Director General for External Relations at the European Commission. As the most senior official under the authority of the High Representative/European Commission Vice-President Baroness Ashton, he helped formulate and execute the EU's foreign policy and played a key role in preparing for the new European External Action Service (EEAS) introduced by the Treaty of Lisbon. He has also held several other posts in EU institutions.

This event is part of the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies' Eurasian Leadership Series.

For photos from this event, please visit: http://flic.kr/s/aHsjuBa6W5

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies and the Ambassadors Forum

Thursday, April 21, 2011
6:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Live From Tokyo: Documentary Screening and Director Q&A


Lewis Rapkin, Director, Live From Tokyo

<i>Live From Tokyo</i> is a 2010 documentary film about the independent and underground music culture in Tokyo, Japan. The film looks at Tokyo's music culture as a reflection of Japanese society and in relation to international music culture. The production team spent six months covering over 100 artists to capture the essence of the city's independent music scene.

Please RSVP at: https://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?hl=en&formkey=dGVpMmJURzh0VFBsNWY4SjFrUTRtd1E6MQ#gid=0

Sponsored by the Organization for Asian Studies (OAS) and the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Friday, April 22, 2011
5:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Rooms 113, 213, 214
1957 E Street, NW

IDS Capstone Presentations


Please join the International Development Studies program for the 2011 Capstone Presentations. Our students will present their findings to their faculty mentors, client organizations, and the GW community. This year's Capstones included diverse projects spanning youth development, child nutrition, labor and property rights, climate change impact, and peace-building.
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This event will be hosted by faculty mentors Sean Roberts, David Gow, and Andrea Bertone.

A reception will follow in the Lindner Family Commons, Suite 602.

Please RSVP at: http://idscapstone.eventbrite.com/

Sponsored by the International Development Studies Program

Monday, April 25, 2011
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM

City View Room, Seventh Floor
1957 E Street, NW

Worldviews of Rising Powers: Domestic Foreign Policy Debates


8:30 AM-9:00 AM- Registration and Continental Breakfast

9:00 AM-9:30 AM- Welcome and Introductory Remarks

Henry R. Nau, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, GW; Director, U.S.-Japan-South Korea Legislative Exchange Program

Deepa Ollapally, Associate Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, GW; Director, India Initiative

9:30 AM-10:30 AM Session I: Domestic Foreign Policy Debates in China

Chair:
Evan Medeiros, Director for Asian Affairs, National Security Council

Presenter:
Professor David Shambaugh, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs; Director, China Policy Program, GW

Discussant:
David Lampton, Dean of Faculty; George and Sadie Hyman Professor of China Studies; Director, China Studies Program, Johns Hopkins University

10:30 AM-11:30 AM Session II: Domestic Foreign Policy Debates in Japan

Chair:
Michael Schiffer, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Defense for East Asia

Presenter:
Professors Richard Samuels, Ford International Professor of Political Science; Director, Center for International Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Discussant:
Sheila A. Smith, Council on Foreign Relations

11:30 AM -12:30 PM Session III: Domestic Foreign Policy Debates in India

Chair:
Robert O. Blake, Jr., Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asian Affairs, U.S. Department of State

Presenters:
Professors Deepa Ollapally Associate Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies; Director, India Initiative, GW

Rajesh Rajagopalan, Professor in International Politics, Jawaharlal Nehru University

Discussant
Daniel Markey, Council on Foreign Relations

12:30 PM-2:00 PM Lunch

Keynote Speaker:
Walter Russell Mead, James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and Humanities at Bard College; Editor-at-Large of The American Interestmagazine

2:00 PM-3:00 PM Session IV: Domestic Foreign Policy Debates in Russia

Chair
Jim Hoagland, The Washington Post

Presenters:
Andrew Kuchins, Director and Senior Fellow, Russia and Eurasia Program, CSIS

Igor Zevelev, Director, MacArthur Foundation, Moscow Office

Discussant
Thomas Graham, Kissinger & Associates

3:00 PM-4:00 PM Session V: Domestic Foreign Policy Debates in Iran

Chair:
Barbara Slavin, The Atlantic Council Presenters

Farideh Farhi, Affiliate Graduate Faculty, University of Hawai'i-Manoa

Discussant:
Gary Sick, Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University

4:00 PM-4:15 PM Coffee/Tea Break

4:15 PM-6:00 PM Implications for U.S. Foreign Policy

Chairs:
Henry R. Nau, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, GW; Director, U.S.-Japan-South Korea Legislative Exchange Program

Deepa Ollapally, Associate Director, Sigur Center for Asian Studies; Director, India Initiative, GW

Keynote Discussants
Thomas R. Pickering, Hills and Company; Career Ambassador

David Sanger, The New York Times

This event is part of the Sigur Center's Rising Power Initiative.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/PolicyBriefingApr25

For photos from this event, please visit:http://flic.kr/s/aHsjv7ScRx

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies and the Carnegie Corporation

Monday, April 25, 2011
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

Monroe Hall, Kendrick Conference Room, Room 321
2115 G Street, NW

Petty Corruption


Mukul Majumdar, H.T. Warshow and Robert Irving Warshow Professor of Economics, Cornell University

This event is part of the Institute for International Economic Policy's Trade and Development Workshop Series.

RSVP: iiep@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Department of Economics and the Institute for International Economic Policy

Wednesday, April 27, 2011
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Democracy Promotion in the Middle East


Ellen Lust, Associate Professor of Political Science, Yale University

Eva Bellin, Associate Professor of Political Science, Hunter College

Steven Heydemann, Senior Vice President, United States Institute of Peace

Moderated by:
Marc Lynch, Director, Institute for Middle East Studies, GW

As the Arab World undergoes a wave of revolutionary demonstrations which have spread from North Africa to the Gulf, three leading political scientists discuss the future of United States democracy promotion and democratic reform prospects in the Middle East.

Lunch will be served.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/6jkz7sq

Sponsored by Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS) and the Institute for Middle East Studies

Wednesday, April 27, 2011
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

The Costs of Justice: How New Leaders Respond to Previous Rights Abuses


Brian K. Grodsky, Assistant Professor of Comparative Politics, University of Maryland

In <i>The Costs of Justice</i>, Brian K. Grodsky provides qualitative analyses of how transitional justice processes have evolved in diverse ways in postcommunist Poland, Croatia, Serbia, and Uzbekistan, by examining the decision-making processes and goals of those actors who contributed to key transitional justice policy decisions. Grodsky draws on extensive interviews with key political figures, human rights leaders, and representatives of various international, state, and nongovernmental bodies, as well as detailed analysis of international and local news reports, to offer a systematic and qualitatively compelling account of transitional justice from the perspective of activists who, at the end of a previous regime, were suddenly transformed from downtrodden victim to empowered judge.
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Grodsky challenges the argument that transitional justice in post-repressive states is largely a function of the relative power of new versus old elites. He maintains that a new regime's transitional justice policy is closely linked to its capacity to provide goods and services expected by constituents, not to political power struggles. In introducing this goods variable, so common to broad political analysis but largely overlooked in the transitional justice debate, Grodsky argues that we must revise our understanding of transitional justice. It is not an exceptional issue; it is but one of many political decisions faced by leaders in a transition state.

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by the Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Wednesday, April 27, 2011
5:30 PM - 7:00 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Emerging India and Its Extended Neighborhood: 15th Annual Gaston Sigur Memorial Lecture with Mani Shankar Aiyar


Mani Shankar Aiyar, Member of Parliament (Rajya Sabha), India

Shri Mani Shankar Aiyar is a current Member of the Indian Parliament in the Rajya Sabha (Council of States). He was thrice-elected to the Lok Sabha (1991-96; 1999-2004; 2004-2009) and served as Minister of Panchayat Raj (2004-09) and Minister of Petroleum and Natural Gas (2004-06), Minister of Youth Affairs and Sports (2006-08) and Minister for Development of North-Eastern Region (2006-09). In 2006, he was conferred "Outstanding Parliamentarian Award" by the President of India. He began his career as a diplomat in the Indian Foreign Service from 1963-89.
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He is a widely published columnist with several newspapers and magazines in India and abroad and has authored numerous books including Remembering Rajiv; In Rajiv's Footsteps: One Year in Parliament; Mani Shankar Aiyar's Pakistan Papers; Knickerwallahs, Silly-Billies and Other Curious Creatures; Rajiv Gandhi's India (in 4 volumes) (ed.); Confessions of a Secular Fundamentalist; and A Time of Transition: Rajiv Gandhi to the 21st Century. He is a frequent commentator on poverty alleviation, foreign policy and nuclear disarmament in India and abroad.

5:30 PM-6:00 PM: Reception 6:00 PM-7:00 PM: Lecture

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/AiyarApr27

Sponsored by the Sigur Center for Asian Studies

Thursday, April 28, 2011
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412
1957 E Street, NW

Borderland Identity and Politics: Ukraine and Moldova After 20 Years of Independence


Ludmila Coada, Fulbright Visiting Scholar, Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, GW; Dean of the History and International Relations Department, Free International University of Moldova

Valentyna Vasylova, Fulbright Visiting Scholar, Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, GW

Discussant:
Charles King, Professor of International Affairs, Georgetown University

Twenty years after the breakup of the Soviet Union, Moldova and Ukraine - the borderlands in perpetual transition - are still building their geopolitical identities and foreign policy. During two decades of independence these countries have oscillated between a closer partnership with Russia and a pro-Western orientation, while neighboring Romania's accession to the European Union has brought the EU eastern frontier to this long contested region, marked in particular by a frozen conflict in Transnistria. The speakers will discuss the two states' borderland politics, both in terms of their geopolitically ambiguous position and the cross-border ethnocultural space defined by conflicting historical memories and overlapping identities.
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Ludmila Coada is an Associate Professor at the Free International University of Moldova (Chisinau), and is currently a Visiting Fulbright Scholar at IERES. Her areas of interest and expertise include foreign policy analysis, including the international behavior of Moldova and other post-Soviet states. She is the author of several scholarly articles on Bassarabian history and the foreign policy of Moldova.
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Valentyna Vasylova holds an MA from Central European University (Hungary) and a PhD from Chernivtsi University (Ukraine), and currently is a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at IERES. Her research interests encompass the post-communist transformations of East Central Europe, (cross-)border regions, frozen conflicts, and historical memory.
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Charles King is Professor at the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University, and an expert on Eastern Europe, nationalism, and ethnic conflict. He has lectured widely on these topics and has worked with broadcast media ranging from CNN and the BBC to the History Channel and MTV. His latest book is Odessa: Genius and Death in a City of Dreams.

RSVP: ieresgwu@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies

Thursday, April 28, 2011
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

Evolving Nationalism: Homeland, Identity, and Religion in Israel


Nadav Shelef, Harvey M. Meyerhoff Assistant Professor of Israel Studies; Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Nadav Shelef, will present remarks on his latest book,<i>Evolving Nationalism: Homeland, Identity, and Religion in Israel 1925-2005</i>.

A limited number of copies of the book will be available for GW students to be signed by the author following the event.

A reception will follow the lecture at 6:00 PM.

Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/5trqdg8

Sponsored by Project on Middle East Political Science (POMEPS) and the Institute for Middle East Studies

Friday, April 29, 2011
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Room 505
1957 E Street, NW

Making Germany's Space Sector Fit for the Future


Wolfgang Schneider, Deputy Head, Space Technologies Division, Aerospace Policy Directorate, Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology, German Federal Government

Mr. Schneider will provide a brief overview of the recently-approved German Federal Government space strategy and discuss its implications, with particular emphasis on opportunities for future U.S.-German space cooperation.

Refreshments will be served.

RSVP: spi@gwu.edu

Sponsored by Space Policy Institute